Monthly Archives: January 2019

Quantile regression in R

January 31, 2019
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Quantile regression in R

Quantile regression: what is it? Let be some response variable of interest, and let be a vector of features or predictors that we want to use to model the response. In linear regression, we are trying to estimate the conditional … Continue reading →

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Resources

January 31, 2019
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Resources

Below is a list of websites and books that I’ve found useful during my journey. As anyone who works in education knows, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all-approach to teaching and learning so, needless to say, your mileage will vary. Books R for Data Science by Hadley Wickham and Garrett Grolemund Practical Statistics for Data Scientists by Peter Bruce and Andrew Bruce R Markdown: The...

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About Me

January 31, 2019
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About Me

I started coding in Python at the age of 35 while in graduate school (thanks Sowmya!). Since then, I have learned the unbridled joy of using a language designed for a singular purpose: R. When I’m not delivering teacher-training workshops, doing analysis of language tests, or other job related activities, I can be found on the mats doing Brazilian jiu-jitsu...

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rOpenSci Software Peer Review: Still Improving

rOpenSci Software Peer Review: Still Improving

rOpenSci’s suite of packages is comprised of contributions from staff engineers and the wider R community, bringing considerable diversity of skills, expertise and experience to bear on the suite. How do we ensure that every package is held to a high standard? That’s where our software review system comes into play: packages contributed by the community undergo a transparent,...

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How GPL makes me leave R for Python :-(

January 31, 2019
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How GPL makes me leave R for Python :-(

Being a data scientist in a startup I can program with several languages, but often R is a natural choice. Recently I wanted my company to build a product based on R. It simply seemed like a perfect fit. But this turned out to be a slippery slope into the open-source code licensing field, which … Continue reading How...

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Using Data Science to read 10 years of Luxembourguish newspapers from the 19th century

Using Data Science to read 10 years of Luxembourguish newspapers from the 19th century

I have been playing around with historical newspaper data (see here and here). I have extracted the data from the largest archive available, as described in the previous blog post, and now created a shiny dashboard where it is possible to visualize the most common words per article, as well as read a summary of each article. The summary was made using a method called...

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Announcing new software peer review editors: Melina Vidoni and Brooke Anderson

Announcing new software peer review editors: Melina Vidoni and Brooke Anderson

We are pleased to welcome Brooke Anderson and Melina Vidoni to our team of Associate Editors for rOpenSci Software Peer Review. They join Scott Chamberlain, Anna Krystalli, Lincoln Mullen, Karthik Ram, Noam Ross and Maëlle Salmon. With the addition of Brooke and Melina, our editorial board now includes four women and four men, located in North America, South America...

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Book review: Beyond Spreadsheets with R

January 30, 2019
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Book review: Beyond Spreadsheets with R

Disclaimer: Manning publications gave me the ebook version of Beyond Spreadsheets with R - A beginner’s guide to R and RStudio by Dr. Jonathan Carroll free of charge. Beyond Spreadsheets with R shows you how to take raw data and transform it for use in computations, tables, graphs, and more. You’ll build on simple programming techniques like loops and conditionals to...

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missing digit in a 114 digit number [a Riddler’s riddle]

January 30, 2019
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missing digit in a 114 digit number [a Riddler’s riddle]

A puzzling riddle from The Riddler (as Le Monde had a painful geometry riddle this week): this number with 114 digits 530,131,801,762,787,739,802,889,792,754,109,70?,139,358,547,710,066,257,652,050,346,294,484,433,323,974,747,960,297,803,292,989,236,183,040,000,000,000 is missing one digit and is a product of some of the integers between 2 and 99. By comparison, 76! and 77! have 112 and 114 digits, respectively. While 99! has 156 digits.

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Outpatient scatter charts: Analysing new and follow up activity with gganimate

January 30, 2019
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Outpatient scatter charts: Analysing new and follow up activity with gganimate

I was inspired by my friend John Mackintosh to have a muck around with the fabulous gganimate. I have to say…. I am in love. I can remember coding this into Excel VBA, to get my animations to work on my data, and now R has the potential. John will remind me that it has...

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