Blog Archives

{pmice}, an experimental package for missing data imputation in parallel using {mice} and {furrr}

Yesterday I wrote this blog post which showed how one could use {furrr} and {mice} to impute missing data in parallel, thus speeding up the process tremendously. To make using this snippet of code easier, I quickly cobbled together an experimental package called {pmice} that you can install from Github: devtools::install_github("b-rodrigues/pmice") For now, it returns a list of mids objects and not a...

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Imputing missing values in parallel using {furrr}

Today I saw this tweet on my timeline: For those of us that just can't wait until RStudio officially supports parallel purrr in #rstats, boy have I got something for you. Introducing `furrr`, parallel purrr through the use of futures. Go ahead, break things, you know you want to:https://t.co/l9z1UC2Tew— Davis Vaughan (@dvaughan32) April 13, 2018 and as a heavy {purrr} user,...

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Get basic summary statistics for all the variables in a data frame

I have added a new function to my {brotools} package, called describe(), which takes a data frame as an argument, and returns another data frame with descriptive statistics. It is very much inspired by the {skmir} package but also by assist::describe() (click on the packages to be redirected to the respective Github repos) but I wanted to write my...

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Keep trying that api call with purrr::possibly()

Sometimes you need to call an api to get some result from a web service, but sometimes this call might fail. You might get an error 500 for example, or maybe you’re making too many calls too fast. Regarding this last point, I really encourage you to read Ethics in Web Scraping. In this blog post I will show you...

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Getting {sparklyr}, {h2o}, {rsparkling} to work together and some fun with bash

This is going to be the type of blog posts that would perhaps be better as a gist, but it is easier for me to use my blog as my own personal collection of gists. Plus, someone else might find this useful, so here it is! In this blog post I am going to show a little trick to...

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Importing 30GB of data in R with sparklyr

February 15, 2018
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Importing 30GB of data in R with sparklyr

Disclaimer: the first part of this blog post draws heavily from Working with CSVs on the Command Line, which is a beautiful resource that lists very nice tips and tricks to work with CSV files before having to load them into R, or any other statistical software. I highly recommend it! Also, if you find this interesting, read also...

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Predicting job search by training a random forest on an unbalanced dataset

February 10, 2018
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Predicting job search by training a random forest on an unbalanced dataset

In this blog post, I am going to train a random forest on census data from the US to predict the probability that someone is looking for a job. To this end, I downloaded the US 1990 census data from the UCI Machine Learning Repository. Having a background in economics, I am always quite interest by such datasets. I...

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Mapping a list of functions to a list of datasets with a list of columns as arguments

This week I had the opportunity to teach R at my workplace, again. This course was the “advanced R” course, and unlike the one I taught at the end of last year, I had one more day (so 3 days in total) where I could show my colleagues the joys of th...

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It’s lists all the way down, part 2: We need to go deeper

It’s lists all the way down, part 2: We need to go deeper

Shortly after my previous blog post, I saw this tweet on my timeline: The purrr resolution for 2018 - learn at least one purrr function per week - is officially launched with encouragement and inspiration from @statwonk and @hadleywickham. We start with modify_depth: https://t.co/dCMnSHP7Pl. Please join to learn and share. #rstats— Isabella R. Ghement (@IsabellaGhement) January 3,...

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It’s lists all the way down

Today, I had the opportunity to help someone over at the R for Data Science Slack group (read more about this group here) and I thought that the question asked could make for an interesting blog post, so here it is! Disclaimer: the way I’m doing things here is totally not optimal, but I want to illustrate how to map...

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