Blog Archives

Lessons Learned from My First MiniCompetion

January 26, 2020
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Editor’s Note: This post does not contain ANY code but describes concepts for data science which are language agnostic. “We do not learn from experience… we learn from reflecting on experience.” ― John Dewey, American Education Reformer After having dabbled in data science for the past few years, I decided to take the leap and attend an intensive data science bootcamp in...

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Mapping World Languages’ Difficulty Relative to English

January 14, 2020
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Mapping World Languages’ Difficulty Relative to English

I was reading r/MapPorn and saw the image below: As fate would have it, the very first comment was from Guridkt who said, “I’d like to see asia too, i wonder if there’s a map of that. (sic)” So would I, so lets do it. About the Data This map is based on data published by the US Foreign Service Institute and,...

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Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps – Part II

July 26, 2019
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Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps – Part II

The previous post focused on collecting the data needed to make custom maps. This post will make use of that data to create maps like the one above as well as some others. While it isn’t necessary to read the previous post, it is recommended. Step 1: Load the Libraries and the Data Now, if you want to review, you can...

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Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps – Part I

July 12, 2019
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Communicating IELTS Averages with Maps – Part I

Maps are great for visualizing dry data. In this series of posts, I’ll demonstrate how to scrape websites in order to turn this: into this: Today, I want to focus on scraping the requisite data for making the map above. Now I could just highlight the table, and then copy and paste it into a spreadsheet, but for really big tables that...

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Coloring Under the Lines in ggplot

July 11, 2019
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Coloring Under the Lines in ggplot

I am tasked with explaining incredibly complex things to people who do not have a lot of time. Consequently, using visuals has been a life saver. One day I was visiting a school explaining the Common Eurpoean Framework of Reference for Languages, which, in a nutshell, describes what language learners can do at different levels of proficiency AND the number...

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About Me

January 31, 2019
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About Me

I started coding in Python at the age of 35 while in graduate school (thanks Sowmya!). Since then, I have learned the unbridled joy of using a language designed for a singular purpose: R. When I’m not delivering teacher-training workshops, doing analysis of language tests, or other job related activities, I can be found on the mats doing Brazilian jiu-jitsu...

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Resources

January 31, 2019
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Resources

Below is a list of websites and books that I’ve found useful during my journey. As anyone who works in education knows, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all-approach to teaching and learning so, needless to say, your mileage will vary. Books R for Data Science by Hadley Wickham and Garrett Grolemund Practical Statistics for Data Scientists by Peter Bruce and Andrew Bruce R Markdown: The...

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