Blog Archives

Hurricanes in South Carolina

November 10, 2013
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Hurricanes in South Carolina

In a recent post, I discussed the occurrence of hurricanes in the North Atlantic basin. The data comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, a member of the US federal government. The data spans a bit more than 150 years. In that post, I make the observation that the data supports a model wherein

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Hurricanes and Reproducible Research

November 8, 2013
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Hurricanes and Reproducible Research

On vacation with my family this week and that means I have a few minutes now and again to read. One of the books I brought along is Christopher Gandrud’s excellent “Reproducible Research with R and RStudio”. Looking for some data as a test project, I latched onto Hurricane data. Folly Beach was hit pretty

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PirateGruntTV

October 1, 2013
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PirateGruntTV

I’m on record as being a big fan of Coursera and have wanted to try and create my own video content ever since I saw theirs. Obviously they’re much better at it than I am, both in terms of production quality and content. Still, there probably isn’t much call for actuarial lectures on their site

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MRMR on CRAN

September 27, 2013
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MRMR on CRAN

MRMR version 0.1.3 is now available on CRAN. This is (almost) the same version that was discussed at the CLRS two weeks ago. MRMR – Multivariate Regression Models for Reserving- is a tool for non-life actuaries to estimate liability reserves. The emphasis is on exploratory data analysis, visualization and model diagnostics. At present, the framework

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PirateGrunt goes to the CLRS

September 16, 2013
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PirateGrunt goes to the CLRS

Yesterday, I had the great pleasure to speak about using R for loss reserving at the Casualty Loss Reserving Seminar in Boston. My time was spent talking about MRMR, an R package that I’ve created. Version 0.1.2 is now on CRAN, but as there are a couple of bugs, I’d suggest waiting until version 0.1.3

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Vectors of S4 classes with non-trivial slots

July 22, 2013
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Vectors of S4 classes with non-trivial slots

Here’s another rabbit hole where I spent a bit of time this evening. I like OOP and I like the way R uses vectors. I’ve created a few classes and had started to code a function which would plot a set of them. It all seemed straightforward until I realized that the infrastructure for treating

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Another view of ordinary regression

July 8, 2013
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Another view of ordinary regression

This is something I’ve been meaning to write for ages. My formal training for most things is limited. Like a lot of folks, I’m an autodidact. This is good in that I’m always learning and always studying those things that I enjoy. At the same time, it means that I take in information in a

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Fun with random effects in loss reserving

July 3, 2013
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Fun with random effects in loss reserving

For some time now, I’ve advocated for the view that non-life loss reserving constitutes a categorized linear regression. I’ll emphasize that the idea of a linear regression isn’t remotely novel. Further, the categorization is the de facto approach. I’m merely recognizing it and suggesting instances where a decision may be made about the optimality of

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More fun with data frames

June 12, 2013
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More fun with data frames

Data frames are such a straightforward and essential element of R that it’s easy to lose sight of some of their peculiarities. Last week, I developed some code which would tear apart some data frames and create new ones based on columns specified by the user. This would allow me to dynamically create new data

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Computed columns for dataframes

May 8, 2013
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Computed columns for dataframes

Everyone loves to aggregate data. Everyone loves to create new columns based on other columns. Everyone hates to do the same thing twice. In my continuing work on multilevel view of loss reserving, I reached a point where I realized that I needed a robust mechanism to aggregate computed columns. SQL server and (I’m assuming)

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