Posts Tagged ‘ stats ’

Simulating data following a given covariance structure

October 12, 2011
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Every year there is at least a couple of occasions when I have to simulate multivariate data that follow a given covariance matrix. For example, let’s say that we want to create an example of the effect of collinearity when … Continue reading →

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On R versus SAS

October 6, 2011
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A short while ago there was a discussion on linkedin about the use of SAS versus R for the enterprise. I have thought a bit about the issue but, as I do not use Linkedin, I did not make any … Continue reading →

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Linear regression with correlated data

October 5, 2011
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I started following the debate on differential minimum wage for youth (15-19 year old) and adults in New Zealand. Eric Crampton has written a nice series of blog posts, making the data from Statistics New Zealand available. I will use … Continue reading →

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How many NYC restaurants get As on their health inspections?

August 15, 2011
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How many NYC restaurants get As on their health inspections?

Decision Science News is no stranger to misleading infographics in free New York newspapers. We could stop reading them entirely, but we find that playing "spot the infographic flaw" makes time fly on the subway. Recently we saw the above graphic in a paper called Metro. Can you spot the goof?

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The Stats Clinic

July 27, 2011
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The Stats Clinic

Here at HSL we have a lot of smart kinda-numerate people who have access to a lot of data. On a bad day, kinda-numerate includes myself, but in general I’m talking about scientists who have have done an introductory stats course, but not much else. When all you have is a t-test, suddenly everything looks

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Best graph ever

July 3, 2011
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Best graph ever

Best graph ever. LARGEST EVER DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 328 and 327 SPOTTED IN NEW YORK CITY

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Resources for Learning R

May 17, 2011
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The information below will be periodically updated at the folowing permanent link: http://www.backsidesmack.com/r-resources/ Searching for information on R sucks. Not only is the language name a letter of the alphabet (an ignominy it shares with C and some less well known languages), there is Pearson’s r and the coefficient of determination, R squared! if you…

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Using R for Introductory Statistics 6, Simulations

March 21, 2011
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Using R for Introductory Statistics 6, Simulations

R can easily generate random samples from a whole library of probability distributions. We might want to do this to gain insight into the distribution's shape and properties. A tricky aspect of statistics is that results like the central limit theore...

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Using R for Introductory Statistics, The Geometric distribution

March 13, 2011
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Using R for Introductory Statistics, The Geometric distribution

We've already seen two discrete probability distributions, the binomial and the hypergeometric. The binomial distribution describes the number of successes in a series of independent trials with replacement. The hypergeometric distribution describes th...

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Bootstrapping the Truncated Normal Distribution

March 2, 2011
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Bootstrapping the Truncated Normal Distribution

Here’s a post generated from my own ignorance of statistics (as opposed to just being marred by it)! In Labor Economics we walked through something called the truncated normal distribution. Truncated distributions come up a lot in the sciences because … Continue reading →

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