Seventeen Minutes From Tweet To Package

May 3, 2018
By

(This article was first published on R – rud.is, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

Earlier today, @noamross posted to Twitter:

The answer was a 1:1 “file upload” curl to httr translation:

httr::POST(
  url = "https://file.io",
  encode = "multipart",
  body = list(file = httr::upload_file("/some/path/to/file")),
)

but I wanted to do more than that since Noam took 20 minutes out his day this week (with no advance warning) to speak to my intro-to-stats class about his work and R.

The Twitter request was (ultimately) a question on how to use R to post content to https://file.io. They have a really simple API, and the timespan from Noam’s request to the initial commit of a fully functional package was roughly 17 minutes. The end product included the ability to post files, strings and R data (something that seemed like a good thing to add).

Not too long after came a v0.1.0 release complete with tests and passing CRAN checks on all platforms.

Noam also suggested I do a screencast:

I don’t normally do screencasts but had some conference call time so folks can follow along at home:

That’s not the best screencast in the world, but it’s very representative of the workflow I used. A great deal of boilerplate package machinations is accomplished with this bash script.

I wasn’t happy with the hurried function name choices I made nor was I thrilled with the package title, description, tests and basic docs, so I revamped all those into another release. That took a while, mostly due to constantly triggering API warnings about being rate-limited.

So, if you have a 5 GB or less file, character vector or in-memory R data you’d like to ephemerally share with others, take the fileio package for a spin:

devtools::install_github("hrbrmstr/fileio")

fileio::fi_post_text("TWFrZSBzdXJlIHRvIEAgbWUgb24gVHdpdHRlciBpZiB5b3UgZGVjb2RlIHRoaXM=")
##   success    key                   link  expiry
## 1    TRUE n18ZSB https://file.io/n18ZSB 14 days

(bonus points if you can figure out what that seemingly random sequence of characters says).

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: R – rud.is.

R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials on topics such as: Data science, Big Data, R jobs, visualization (ggplot2, Boxplots, maps, animation), programming (RStudio, Sweave, LaTeX, SQL, Eclipse, git, hadoop, Web Scraping) statistics (regression, PCA, time series, trading) and more...



If you got this far, why not subscribe for updates from the site? Choose your flavor: e-mail, twitter, RSS, or facebook...

Comments are closed.

Search R-bloggers

Sponsors

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)