Blog Archives

Royal Society of Biology: Introduction to Reproducible Analyses in R

May 23, 2019
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Royal Society of Biology: Introduction to Reproducible Analyses in R

Learn to experiment with R to make analyses and figures more reproducible If you’re in the UK and not too far from York you might be interested in a Royal Society of Biology course which forms part of the Industry Skills Certificate. More details at this link Introduction to Reproducible Analyses in R 24 June… Continue reading Royal Society...

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Introduction to Data Analysis in RStudio

January 23, 2019
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Introduction to Data Analysis in RStudio

I’ve just started doing one of my favourite parts of my job – teaching a term of Data Analysis in R to about three hundred Bioscientists in their first year of higher education. My blog last week included a figure of their expected level of enjoyment: However,  I find they become very competent in both statistics… Continue reading Introduction to...

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Using DataCamp reduces anxiety about learning R!

January 16, 2019
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Using DataCamp reduces anxiety about learning R!

I used DataCamp‘s excellent Introduction to R as Essential Prior Independent Study and found it made people a bit less worried about a term of R! I have a lot of fun teaching first year biology undergraduates but there are a few challenges in teaching data skills when they are not (perceived as) a student’s core discipline… Continue reading Using DataCamp...

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Adding different annotation to each facet in ggplot

November 6, 2018
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Adding different annotation to each facet in ggplot

Help! The same annotations go on every facet! (with thanks to a student for sending me her attempt). This is a question I get fairly often and the answer is not straightforward especially for those that are relatively new to R and ggplot2. In this post, I will show you how to add different annotations… Continue reading Adding different...

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Communicate your work with animated graphs in R!

July 25, 2018
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Communicate your work with animated graphs in R!

It’s easy to animate graphs in R In this post am I going to show you how easy it is to animate figures in R thanks to the great ggplot2 extension gganimate written by Thomas Lin Pedersen and David Robinson This is something you might want to do to increase the impact of your work… Continue reading Communicate your...

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R Code Anatomy

July 12, 2018
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It’s a challenge for an experienced user to remember what it was like to be totally new to R and come up with explanations that don’t draw on understanding developed subsequently. Terminology with which you have become very familiar is, in fact, jargon. So I asked a novice, Elliot, to explain a piece of code… Continue reading R Code...

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RStudio Anatomy

July 4, 2018
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RStudio makes R easier to use. It includes a code editor, debugging & visualization tools. I love it but when beginners launch RStudio they are sometimes confused by all the panes and tabs. Here I have tried to give a quick visual guide to the anatomy of RStudio for people new to R, coding and RStudio. I’d love… Continue reading RStudio Anatomy...

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It’s easy to cite and reference R!

June 15, 2018
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Remember to reference R When people are new to using R and, perhaps, to referencing and report writing in general, they often don’t know they should cite and reference R and its packages. We do this for the same reasons we reference any thing else in any academic work. We need to support our arguments… Continue reading It’s easy...

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Fun and easy R graphs with images

June 13, 2018
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Fun and easy R graphs with images

Code for fun I feel passionately that anyone can learn some coding but many feel they lack natural aptitude for it. One of the things I always try to stress to those I am teaching is that it matters very much less what you do than that do you it. It doesn’t matter how small… Continue reading Fun and...

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Not all common gulls are Common Gulls…

June 7, 2018
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 … and non-normally distributed data can be normal One of the underlying assumptions of many statistical methods is that the data (or the model residuals) are normally distributed. I teach students to evaluate this assumption with plots and normality tests. When they find their data do not seem to be normally distributed, they often report:… Continue reading Not all...

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