Monthly Archives: February 2009

R: Calculating all possible linear regression models for a given set of predictors

February 6, 2009
By
R: Calculating all possible linear regression models for a given set of predictors

Although the graphic at the left might not seem a 100% appropriate, it gives a hint to what I am about to do. I want to calculate all possible linear regression models with one dependent and several independent variables. I do not want to address bias and fitting issues or the question if this

Read more »

Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) using R

February 5, 2009
By
Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) using R

I found some useful websites showing examples of how to use R for various sorts of ANOVA (between, within, mixed designs, etc): Using R for Psychological Research Quick-R for SAS/SPSS/Stata users enjoy

Read more »

R-Sessions 31: Combining lmer output in a single table (UPDATED)

February 5, 2009
By

There are various ways of getting your output from R to your publication draft. Most of them are highly efficient, but unfortunately I couldn’t find a function that combines the output from several (lmer) models and presents it in a single table....

Read more »

If I Had a Text File, I’d Hack Regexes in the Morning

February 4, 2009
By
If I Had a Text File, I’d Hack Regexes in the Morning

Yesterday the topic of academic citation counts came up, so I decided that I should write up some tools for exploring cite counts. The first thing I did was to build a cheap screenscraper in Ruby for pulling citation count information from Google schol...

Read more »

Correct Datetime / POSIXct behaviour for R and kdb+

February 3, 2009
By

We have started to look into kdb+ as a possible high-performance column-store backend. Kx offers free trials -- and so I have played with this for a day or two, both the general system, data loads and dumps and in particular with the interface to R, Based on the few files (one C source with interface code, one R file to access the...

Read more »

Online R programming resources

February 2, 2009
By

R can legitimately be called both a programming language and a statistical package. Many books address both the programming and statistical components of R, but invariably the discussion of statistical topics is more detailed than the discussion of pr...

Read more »

Don’t group Figures in Word

Don’t group Figures in Word

One of my ongoing annoyances with Microsoft Word is its inability to handle figures in a consistent way. The last quirk I discovered is the following: if you group a figure with a textbox -- something often done for creating captions -- the print quali...

Read more »

Sponsors

Mango solutions



plotly webpage

dominolab webpage



Zero Inflated Models and Generalized Linear Mixed Models with R

Quantide: statistical consulting and training

datasociety

http://www.eoda.de





ODSC

ODSC

CRC R books series





Six Sigma Online Training









Contact us if you wish to help support R-bloggers, and place your banner here.

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)