358 search results for "sweave"

Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

January 13, 2012
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Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

I have been working on a new package makeR to help manage Sweave projects where you wish to create multiple versions of documents that are based on a single source. For example, I create lots of monthly and quarterly reports using Sweave and the only differences between versions are a few variables. I have used GNU

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Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

January 13, 2012
By
Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

I have been working on a new package makeR to help manage Sweave projects where you wish to create multiple versions of documents that are based on a single source. For example, I create lots of monthly and quarterly reports using Sweave and the only ...

Read more »

Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

January 13, 2012
By
Retrieving RSS Feeds Using Google Reader

I have been working on a new package makeR to help manage Sweave projects where you wish to create multiple versions of documents that are based on a single source. For example, I create lots of monthly and quarterly reports using Sweave and the only ...

Read more »

Creating LaTeX Tables from Zelig and Statnet objects

January 9, 2012
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As a PhD student that uses quantitative methods a lot, one annoying part of my job is to type up my results, especially formatting tables with regression models can be a lot of work. Luckily there is an excellent package in R, apsrtable, which will gen...

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useR! 2012 Simple Abstract Helper

January 3, 2012
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useR! 2012 Simple Abstract Helper

useR! 2012 has issued a call for abstracts! I've extended the WebSweave concept to offer a tool to create simple abstracts online, including those with markup, which may then be submitted at the conference website. Use the following link for the Simple Abstract Helper.

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Top 20 R posts of 2011 (and some R-bloggers statistics)

January 1, 2012
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Top 20 R posts of 2011 (and some R-bloggers statistics)

R-bloggers.com is now two years young. The site is an (unofficial) online R journal written by bloggers who agreed to contribute their R articles to the site. In this post I wish to celebrate R-bloggers’ second birthmounth by sharing with you: Links to the top 20 posts of 2011 Statistics on “how well” R-bloggers did Read more...

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R 2.14.1 is released

December 22, 2011
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Peter Dalgaard announced today the release of the new R version 2.14.1.  Bellow is the announcement.  For R users who are using windows, I suggest to also have a look at one of the following two posts, suggestion an alternative strategy for how to more easily upgrade R under Windows XP, or under windows 7 (which tends to have more permission...

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December 2011 issue of the R Journal: An overview

December 20, 2011
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December 2011 issue of the R Journal: An overview

The December 2011 issue of the R Journal is now available for download. Three times a year, the open-access journal of the R project publishes peer-reviewed articles on research and applications of R and R packages. As of the latest issue, all articles are published under a Creative Commons license, making them accessible for translation, academic and commercial uses...

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The R Journal (Volume 3/2, December 2011) is out

December 19, 2011
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The new R journal for December 2011 is out! You can Download the complete issue from here, while refereed articles may be downloaded individually using the links below: Table of Contents Editorial 3   Contributed Research Articles   Creating and Deploying an Application with (R)Excel and R  Thomas Baier, Erich Neuwirth and Michele De Meo 5 glm2: Fitting Generalized Linear Models...

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How to Become an Efficient and Collaborative R Programmer

December 12, 2011
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I may want to add a subtitle “Why R-Forge Must Die” (thinking of Barry Rowlingson’s talk earlier this year). I have been a GitHub user for two years, and I was mainly influenced by Hadley. Now I even feel a little bit addicted to GitHub (its slogan is “social coding”), because it is really convenient

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