Sketchnotes from TWiML&AI #91: Philosophy of Intelligence with Matthew Crosby

January 13, 2018
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These are my sketchnotes for Sam Charrington’s podcast This Week in Machine Learning and AI about Philosophy of Intelligence with Matthew Crosby:

You can listen to the podcast here.

This week on the podcast we’re featuring a series of conversations from the NIPs conference in Long Beach, California. I attended a bunch of talks and learned a ton, organized an impromptu roundtable on Building AI Products, and met a bunch of great people, including some former TWiML Talk guests.This time around i’m joined by Matthew Crosby, a researcher at Imperial College London, working on the Kinds of Intelligence Project. Matthew joined me after the NIPS Symposium of the same name, an event that brought researchers from a variety of disciplines together towards three aims: a broader perspective of the possible types of intelligence beyond human intelligence, better measurements of intelligence, and a more purposeful analysis of where progress should be made in AI to best benefit society. Matthew’s research explores intelligence from a philosophical perspective, exploring ideas like predictive processing and controlled hallucination, and how these theories of intelligence impact the way we approach creating artificial intelligence. This was a very interesting conversation, i’m sure you’ll enjoy. https://twimlai.com/twiml-talk-91-philosophy-intelligence-matthew-crosby/

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