Modeling Frequency in Operational Losses with Python

December 8, 2015
By

(This article was first published on Yet Another Blog in Statistical Computing » S+/R, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

Poisson and Negative Binomial regressions are two popular approaches to model frequency measures in the operational loss and can be implemented in Python with the statsmodels package as below:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: import statsmodels.api as sm

In [3]: import statsmodels.formula.api as smf

In [4]: df = pd.read_csv("AutoCollision.csv")

In [5]: # FITTING A POISSON REGRESSION

In [6]: poisson = smf.glm(formula = "Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use", data = df, family = sm.families.Poisson(sm.families.links.log))

In [7]: poisson.fit().summary()
Out[7]:
<class 'statsmodels.iolib.summary.Summary'>
"""
                 Generalized Linear Model Regression Results
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:            Claim_Count   No. Observations:                   32
Model:                            GLM   Df Residuals:                       21
Model Family:                 Poisson   Df Model:                           10
Link Function:                    log   Scale:                             1.0
Method:                          IRLS   Log-Likelihood:                -204.40
Date:                Tue, 08 Dec 2015   Deviance:                       184.72
Time:                        20:31:27   Pearson chi2:                     184.
No. Iterations:                     9
=============================================================================================
                                coef    std err          z      P>|z|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intercept                     2.3702      0.110     21.588      0.000         2.155     2.585
Age[T.21-24]                  1.4249      0.118     12.069      0.000         1.193     1.656
Age[T.25-29]                  2.3465      0.111     21.148      0.000         2.129     2.564
Age[T.30-34]                  2.5153      0.110     22.825      0.000         2.299     2.731
Age[T.35-39]                  2.5821      0.110     23.488      0.000         2.367     2.798
Age[T.40-49]                  3.2247      0.108     29.834      0.000         3.013     3.437
Age[T.50-59]                  3.0019      0.109     27.641      0.000         2.789     3.215
Age[T.60+]                    2.6391      0.110     24.053      0.000         2.424     2.854
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveLong]      0.9246      0.036     25.652      0.000         0.854     0.995
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveShort]     1.2856      0.034     37.307      0.000         1.218     1.353
Vehicle_Use[T.Pleasure]       0.1659      0.041      4.002      0.000         0.085     0.247
=============================================================================================
"""

In [8]: # FITTING A NEGATIVE BINOMIAL REGRESSION

In [9]: nbinom = smf.glm(formula = "Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use", data = df, family = sm.families.NegativeBinomial(sm.families.links.log))

In [10]: nbinom.fit().summary()
Out[10]:
<class 'statsmodels.iolib.summary.Summary'>
"""
                 Generalized Linear Model Regression Results
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:            Claim_Count   No. Observations:                   32
Model:                            GLM   Df Residuals:                       21
Model Family:        NegativeBinomial   Df Model:                           10
Link Function:                    log   Scale:                 0.0646089484752
Method:                          IRLS   Log-Likelihood:                -198.15
Date:                Tue, 08 Dec 2015   Deviance:                       1.4436
Time:                        20:31:27   Pearson chi2:                     1.36
No. Iterations:                    11
=============================================================================================
                                coef    std err          z      P>|z|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intercept                     2.2939      0.153     14.988      0.000         1.994     2.594
Age[T.21-24]                  1.4546      0.183      7.950      0.000         1.096     1.813
Age[T.25-29]                  2.4133      0.183     13.216      0.000         2.055     2.771
Age[T.30-34]                  2.5636      0.183     14.042      0.000         2.206     2.921
Age[T.35-39]                  2.6259      0.183     14.384      0.000         2.268     2.984
Age[T.40-49]                  3.2408      0.182     17.760      0.000         2.883     3.598
Age[T.50-59]                  2.9717      0.183     16.283      0.000         2.614     3.329
Age[T.60+]                    2.6404      0.183     14.463      0.000         2.283     2.998
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveLong]      0.9480      0.128      7.408      0.000         0.697     1.199
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveShort]     1.3402      0.128     10.480      0.000         1.090     1.591
Vehicle_Use[T.Pleasure]       0.3265      0.128      2.548      0.011         0.075     0.578
=============================================================================================
"""

Although Quasi-Poisson regressions is not currently supported by the statsmodels package, we are still able to estimate the model with the rpy2 package by using R in the back-end. As shown in the output below, parameter estimates in Quasi-Poisson model are identical to the ones in standard Poisson model. In case that we want a flexible model approach for frequency measures in the operational loss forecast without pursuing more complex Negative Binomial model, Quasi-Poisson regression can be considered a serious contender.

In [11]: # FITTING A QUASI-POISSON REGRESSION

In [12]: import rpy2.robjects as ro

In [13]: from rpy2.robjects import pandas2ri

In [14]: pandas2ri.activate()

In [15]: rdf = pandas2ri.py2ri_pandasdataframe(df)

In [16]: qpoisson = ro.r.glm('Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use', data = rdf, family = ro.r('quasipoisson(link = "log")'))

In [17]: print ro.r.summary(qpoisson)

Coefficients:
                      Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)
(Intercept)             2.3702     0.3252   7.288 3.55e-07 ***
Age21-24                1.4249     0.3497   4.074 0.000544 ***
Age25-29                2.3465     0.3287   7.140 4.85e-07 ***
Age30-34                2.5153     0.3264   7.705 1.49e-07 ***
Age35-39                2.5821     0.3256   7.929 9.49e-08 ***
Age40-49                3.2247     0.3202  10.072 1.71e-09 ***
Age50-59                3.0019     0.3217   9.331 6.42e-09 ***
Age60+                  2.6391     0.3250   8.120 6.48e-08 ***
Vehicle_UseDriveLong    0.9246     0.1068   8.660 2.26e-08 ***
Vehicle_UseDriveShort   1.2856     0.1021  12.595 2.97e-11 ***
Vehicle_UsePleasure     0.1659     0.1228   1.351 0.191016
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

(Dispersion parameter for quasipoisson family taken to be 8.774501)

    Null deviance: 6064.97  on 31  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance:  184.72  on 21  degrees of freedom
AIC: NA

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 4

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