Introduction to R for Excel Users

May 3, 2016
By

(This article was first published on RStats – Tom Hopper, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

Download the PDF

As the saying goes, when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Excel was designed to do simple financial analyses and to craft financial statements. Though its capabilities have been expanded over the years, it was never designed to perform the sort of data analysis that industry scientists, engineers and Six Sigma belts need to perform on a daily basis.

Most data analyses performed in Excel look more like simple financial spreadsheets rather than actual data analysis, and this quality of work translates into bad—or at least sub-optimal—business decisions. There are alternatives to Excel, and the free, open-source data analysis platform R is one of them.

Unfortunately, R has a steep learning curve. I’m offering, for free, a short primer on R [PDF] where I’ve sought to make that learning curve a little less painful for engineers and scientists who normally work in Excel.

Background

A couple of years ago, I was developing a short course to teach R to scientists and engineers in industry who normally used Excel. The goal was to help them transition to a more capable tool. My course design notes morphed into a handout, and when plans for the course fell through, that handout grew into a self-study guide, which I later adapted into this seventy-page, stand-alone introduction for Excel users.

Organization

The primer walks the reader through the basics of R, starting with a brief overview of capabilities, then diving into installation, basic operations, graphical analysis and basic statistics. I believe that a picture is worth a thousand words, so it’s light on text and heavy on examples and visuals.

The end of the book rounds out with a look at some of the most useful add-ons, the briefest of introductions to writing your own, custom functions in R, and a cross-reference of common Excel functions with their equivalents in R.

The text is broken up into chapters and fully indexed so that it can be used either as a walk-through tutorial or as a quick reference.

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: RStats – Tom Hopper.

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