Blog Archives

ggformula: another option for teaching graphics in R to beginners

September 21, 2017
By
ggformula: another option for teaching graphics in R to beginners

A previous entry (http://sas-and-r.blogspot.com/2017/07/options-for-teaching-r-to-beginners.html) describes an approach to teaching graphics in R that also “get students doing powerful things quickly”, as David Robinson suggested. In this guest blog entry, Randall Pruim offers an alternative way based on a different formula interface. Here's Randall: For a number of years I and several of my colleagues have been teaching R to beginners...

Read more »

Options for teaching R to beginners: a false dichotomy?

July 27, 2017
By
Options for teaching R to beginners: a false dichotomy?

I've been reading David Robinson's excellent blog entry "Teach the tidyverse to beginners" (http://varianceexplained.org/r/teach-tidyverse), which argues that a tidyverse approach is the best way to teach beginners.  He summarizes two competing curricula:1) "Base R first": teach syntax such as $ and ], built in functions like ave() and tapply(), and use base graphics2) "Tidyverse first": start from scratch with...

Read more »

thinking with data with "Modern Data Science with R"

July 26, 2017
By
thinking with data with "Modern Data Science with R"

One of the biggest challenges educators face is how to teach statistical thinking integrated with data and computing skills to allow our students to fluidly think with data.  Contemporary data science requires a tight integration of knowledge from statistics, computer science, mathematics, and a domain of application. For example, how can one model high earnings as a function of other features...

Read more »

R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

January 6, 2016
By
R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

We're pleased to announce that a special issue of the American Statistician on "Statistics and the Undergraduate Curriculum" (November, 2015) is available at http://amstat.tandfonline.com/toc/utas20/69/4. Johanna Hardin (Pomona College) and Nick were the guest editors. There are a number of excellent and provocative papers that reinforce the importance of computing using tools such as R and...

Read more »

R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

January 6, 2016
By
R and SAS in the curriculum: getting students to "think with data"

We're pleased to announce that a special issue of the American Statistician on "Statistics and the Undergraduate Curriculum" (November, 2015) is available at http://amstat.tandfonline.com/toc/utas20/69/4. Johanna Hardin (Pomona College) and Nick were the guest editors. There are a number of excellent and provocative papers that reinforce the importance of computing using tools such as R and...

Read more »

2015.2: Did the New England Patriots experience a decrease in fumbles starting in 2007?

February 1, 2015
By
2015.2: Did the New England Patriots experience a decrease in fumbles starting in 2007?

Here's a timely guest entry from Jeffrey Witmer (Oberlin College). As the “Deflate Gate” saga was unfolding, Warren Sharp analyzed “touches per fumble” for NFL teams before and after 2006, when a rule was changed so that teams playing on the road could provide their own footballs (http://www.sharpfootballanalysis.com/blog/). Sharp noted that, for whatever reason, the Patriots went from...

Read more »

Example 2014.13: Statistics doesn’t have to be so hard! Resampling in R and SAS

November 17, 2014
By
Example 2014.13: Statistics doesn’t have to be so hard! Resampling in R and SAS

A recent post pointed us to a great talk that elegantly described how inferences from a trial could be analyzed with a purely resampling-based approach. The talk uses data from a paper that considered the association between beer consumption and mosqu...

Read more »

The Statistical Sleuth (second edition) in R

August 14, 2012
By
The Statistical Sleuth (second edition) in R

For those of you who teach, or are interested in seeing an illustrated series of analyses, there is a new compendium of files to help describe how to fit models for the extended case studies in the Second Edition of the Statistical Sleuth: A Course in...

Read more »

Example 9.38: dynamite plots, revisited

July 16, 2012
By
Example 9.38: dynamite plots, revisited

Dynamite plots are a somewhat pejorative term for a graphical display where the height of a bar indicates the mean, and the vertical line on top of it represents the standard deviation (or standard error). These displays are commonly found in many scientific disciplines, as a way of communicating group differences in means. Many find these displays troubling. ...

Read more »

Example 9.37: (Mis)behavior of binomial confidence intervals

July 9, 2012
By
Example 9.37: (Mis)behavior of binomial confidence intervals

While traditional statistics courses teach students to calculate intervals and test for binomial proportions using a normal or t approximation, this method does not always work well. Agresti and Coull ("Approximate is better than "exact' for interval estimation of binomial proportions". The American Statistician, 1998; 52:119-126) demonstrated this and reintroduced an improved (Plus4) estimator originally due to Wilson...

Read more »

Search R-bloggers


Sponsors

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)