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More components of the R ecosystem

This note lists a few of the organizations that are pushing the R language forward, as of early 2017. R is happy language right now. Historically, the R Project for Statistical Computing has been supported by the R Foundation since its inception in 2...

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Technologies worth learning for data science

As a complement to my note on R as a data science language, this note lists ten other technologies that you might want to learn to use, or at least monitor, if you are interested in learning data science. Communication Git is a concurrent versioning...

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R as a data science language

R as a data science language

The R language is a ‘DSL’ – a domain-specific language. The domain that it deals with, however, is not well-defined. In this note, I call R a “data science language” and link to a few resources that make the point better than I could. R as a domain-specific language A few years ago, John D. Cook gave a...

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Turning KML into tidy data frames

Turning KML into tidy data frames

This note briefly introduces the tidykml package, which turns basic KML geometries into tidy data frames that can be visualized with ggplot2. Summary The tidykml package provides a quick way to import data from Google My Maps into R, in a format that makes it easy to manipulate the data and visualize it with ggplot2. Below is...

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Scraping Web sources: Two illustrations

Scraping Web sources: Two illustrations

Per request from a couple of students in a course on open data that I contribute to, here’s a short guide to the “why” and “how” questions about (Web) scraping, with links to examples to illustrate the usefulness of the technique. What is scraping? (Web) Scraping consists in writing computer code to automate the download and/or parsing of online data...

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Remember to use the RDS format

Note to self – Remember to serialize R objects as RDS files when it makes sense. Importing Stata data into R The European Social Survey recently announced that it had added Round 7 of its survey to its cumulative dataset, which can be downloaded in CSV, SPSS or Stata format. While my instinctive preference for storing data is to...

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Compiling the ggplot2 book on Mac OS

Compiling the ggplot2 book on Mac OS

This note explains to compile Hadley Wickham’s ggplot2 book on Mac OS. This guide has 8 steps. If you have already installed R and RStudio, you should be able to get through Steps 1-4 very quickly. Similarly, if you use Git, Steps 5-6 should also be very straightforward. The longest steps are Step 7 (package dependencies) and Step 8 (book compilation). 1....

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One year of R / Notes

September 20, 2016
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My collection of R notes is now slightly over one year old. This note reflects on how useful the exercise of blogging about R has been so far, and answers some of the questions that I have received about it. Blogging about R I created my collection of R notes with the intention to keep track of technical notes that...

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Collapsing a bipartite co-occurrence network

September 15, 2016
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Collapsing a bipartite co-occurrence network

This note is a follow-up to the previous one. It shows how to use student-submitted keywords to find clusters of shared interests between the students. Dear students If you enjoyed my previous note, this one might also entertain you. And since your real first names are used in the data, you should be able to tell me later if...

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Turning keywords into a co-occurrence network

Turning keywords into a co-occurrence network

This post is addressed to the GLM Fall 2016 students who are currently taking my Statistical Reasoning and Quantitative Methods course at Sciences Po in Paris. Dear students Since you are going to learn a lot of statistical computing/programming this semester, I thought it would be a good idea to show you a quick example of what you can...

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