Posts Tagged ‘ publications ’

Border bias and weighted kernels

August 31, 2012
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Border bias and weighted kernels

With Ewen (aka @3wen), not only we have been playing on Twitter this month, we have also been working on kernel estimation for densities of spatial processes. Actually, it is only a part of what he was working on, but that part on kernel estimation...

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Survival paper (update)

January 13, 2011
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Survival paper (update)

In a recent post, I discussed some  statistical consultancy I was involved with. I was quite proud of the nice ggplot2 graphics I had created. The graphs nicely summarised the main points of the paper: I’ve just had the proofs from the journal, and next to the graphs there is the following note: It is

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Generating stress scenarios: null correlation is not enough

December 28, 2010
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Generating stress scenarios: null correlation is not enough

In a recent post (here, by @teramonagi), Teramonagi mentioned the use of PCA to model yield curve, i.e. to obtain the three factor, "parallel shift", "twist" and "butterfly". As in Nelson & Siegel, if m is maturity, is the yield of the cu...

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New paper: Survival analysis

December 8, 2010
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New paper: Survival analysis

Each year I try to carry out some statistical consultancy to give me experience in other areas of statistics and also to provide teaching examples. Last Christmas I was approached by a paediatric consultant from the RVI who wanted to carry out prospective survival analysis. The consultant, Bruce  Jaffray, had performed Nissen fundoplication surgery on

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Analysis of retractions in PubMed

November 30, 2010
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Analysis of retractions in PubMed

As so often happens these days, a brief post at FriendFeed got me thinking about data analysis. Entitled “So how many retractions are there every year, anyway?”, the post links to this article at Retraction Watch. It discusses ways to estimate the number of retractions and in particular, a recent article in the Journal of

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Findings increasingly novel, scientists say…

October 29, 2010
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Findings increasingly novel, scientists say…

…was the tongue-in-cheek title of an image that I posted to Twitpic this week. It shows the usage of the word “novel” in PubMed article titles over time. As someone correctly pointed out at FriendFeed, it needs to be corrected for total publications per year. It was inspired by a couple of items that caught

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