984 search results for "rstudio"

Wikipedia page views

January 16, 2013
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Wikipedia page views

Here I present an application that quantifies Wikipedia page views. It can visualise any topic in any language. It is (shamelessly) based on an application by the blogger Andrew Clark (pssguy), whose code is available here.I have added:multi ...

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Visualize Color Palettes in Interactive 3D Grid (Shiny + RGL)

January 12, 2013
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Visualize Color Palettes in Interactive 3D Grid (Shiny + RGL)

You can view the application online at http://trestletechnology.net:3838/rgl/! (Bear with us as we try out the very early release of Shiny Server. There may be some downtime and manual restarts of the service required in the next couple of weeks. Please drop us a line if it’s not working as you expected.) This is an

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Shiny = Happy People

January 11, 2013
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The people behind the wonderful RStudio, which I gushed about in a previous post, have developed a new package, Shiny, that makes it easy to develop interactive web applications with R. Shiny is not the first package to facilitate building web apps with R (see here for comparison of Shiny and gWidgetsWWW2.rapache), but it is

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Shiny Apps

January 11, 2013
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Shiny Apps

I have been working on developing some interactive tools for demonstrating statistical principles. The advent of the shiny framework for R from the RStudio team has made this very easy to do. These demos are still in the development...

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Install R in Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

January 10, 2013
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R is a free software environment for statistical computing and graphics. It compiles and runs on a wide variety of UNIX platforms, Windows and MacOS. One of my main motivations to install R is Sweave. The Sweave is a literate programming language which integrates LaTeX and R code. The main idea of the Sweave is to combine data analysis code...

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Revisiting Cronbach 1951 via Simulation with Shiny

January 9, 2013
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Revisiting Cronbach 1951 via Simulation with Shiny

At the time of the creation of this blog, Cronbach’s 1951 piece on coefficient alpha has 18,132 citations according to google scholar.  The main use of coefficient alpha is to assess internal consistency reliability of a test or survey.   Although it may have been forgotten, the proof Cronbach demonstrated established that coefficient alpha is the mean of all split...

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Revisiting Cronbach 1951 via Simulation with Shiny

January 9, 2013
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Revisiting Cronbach 1951 via Simulation with Shiny

At the time of the creation of this blog, Cronbach’s 1951 piece on coefficient alpha has 18,132 citations according to google scholar.  The main use of coefficient alpha is to assess internal consistency reliability of a test or survey.   Although it may have been forgotten, the proof Cronbach demonstrated established that coefficient alpha is the mean of all split...

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Interactive MDS visualisation using D3

January 8, 2013
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Interactive MDS visualisation using D3

Here’s a sneak peak into upcoming visualisation work. I’ve been working a bit on MDS (Multi-dimensional scaling), a classical technique for visualising distance data. Classical MDS is useful, but interactive MDS is *much* more useful. Using D3, a Javascript visualisation framework, it’s relatively easy to make interactive MDS plots. This example shows how basic interaction

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Don’t R alone! A guide to tools for collaboration with R

January 7, 2013
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Don’t R alone! A guide to tools for collaboration with R

This a brief guide to using R in collaborative, social ways. R is a powerful open-source programming language for data analysis, statistics, and visualization, but much of its power derives from a large, engaged community of users. This is an introduction to tools for engaging the community to improve your R code and collaborate with others. (Am I...

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Demonstrating Confidence Intervals with Shiny

January 6, 2013
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Demonstrating Confidence Intervals with Shiny

For the introductory statistic student confidence intervals can seem a daunting concept to grasp.  Quite simply put it is an interval that we have a certain measure of confidence that the population parameter falls into.  The 95% confidence is the most common value chosen in my academic circle.  Nevertheless, many others may be viable as well as long as...

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