38 search results for "rattle"

OpenScoring: Open Source Scoring of PMML Models via REST

November 27, 2012
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OpenScoring: Open Source Scoring of PMML Models via REST

The other day I stumbled accross an amazing PMML model API called jpmml.  It's written in Java and supports PMML 4.1 (and older).  Neural networks, random forests, regression and trees PMML models can be consumed and used for scoring.I decide...

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Book Review: R for Business Analytics, A Ohri

October 26, 2012
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Book Review:    R for Business Analytics,    A Ohri

      I've added a recently released book to my list of recommendations (at the amazon carousel to the right), as I've reviewed a copy provided to me via Springer Publishers. The book is R for Business Analytics, authored by A Ohri.&nbsp...

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Getting Started Using R, Part 1: RStudio

August 4, 2012
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Getting Started Using R, Part 1:  RStudio

Despite my preference for SAS over R, there are some add-ons to “basic” R that I’ve found that have made my learning process way easier.  While I’m still in my infancy in learning R, I feel like once I found … Continue reading →Getting Started Using R, Part 1: RStudio is an article from randyzwitch.com,...

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Will 2015 be the Beginning of the End for SAS and SPSS?

May 15, 2012
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Will 2015 be the Beginning of the End for SAS and SPSS?

Learning to use a data analysis tool well takes significant effort, so people tend to continue using the tool they learned in college for much of their careers. As a result, the software used by professors and their students is … Continue reading →

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Use R!

July 7, 2011
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Use R!

In short: R is a free intuitive programming language that is used by practitioners in a plethora of academic disciplines. Therefore, it is on the cutting edge, and expanding rapidly. It creates stunning visuals, works seamlessly together with LaTeX, has really good online documentation and the community is unparalleled. A week...

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Predicting R models with PMML: Revolution R Enterprise and ADAPA

March 24, 2011
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The recently announced Revolution Analytics / Zementis partnership goes a long way towards demonstrating how R fits into big-league production environments. A frequent complaint against R is that although R is fine prototyping tool it is not able to handle production environments. Well, that’s just not true. In fact, it is straightforward to build a model in R, translate...

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Did you feel that?

December 23, 2010
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Did you feel that?

There was a small earthquake in northern England on Tuesday. Barry Rowlingson felt the quake (it rattled the photographs on his wall), but didn't know how big of a quake it was because he didn't know how close he was to the epicentre. The British Geological Survey hadn't yet announced the quake, but did give access to seismograph readings,...

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The Data Science Venn Diagram

October 5, 2010
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The Data Science Venn Diagram

Whenever I'm asked, "Who uses R?", I usually rattle off a long list of job titles: statistician, analyst, quant, researcher ... and that's before all the domain-specific titles. It would be nice if there were a simple, succinct phrase to describe the process of working with, analyzing, and communicating with real data. At the new blog, "dataists", the inaugural...

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R and Analytics: A good career choice

August 24, 2010
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According to Microsoft, the hottest three new tech majors are: Data Mining/Machine Learning/AI/Natural Language Processing Business Intelligence/Competitive Intelligence Analytics/Statistics – specifically Web Analytics, A/B Testing and statistical analysis Tim O'Reilly concurs. Of course, R features prominently in most of these areas -- follow the links I added above for examples -- and is growing rapidly, so learning R makes...

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Newcomb, Benford, and their Dirty, Dirty Logarithms

August 22, 2010
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Newcomb, Benford, and their Dirty, Dirty Logarithms

Tom Taverner introduced me to Benford’s Law as we were eating lunch together at a statistical computing conference: If you look at the first digits of data in many naturally-occuring datasets, a startling 30 percent of them are ones. “Pah!” I said. “That belies intuition! Why would one digit occur any more than another? I’d

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