1765 search results for "ggplot2"

one-dimensional integrals

December 25, 2010
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one-dimensional integrals

The foundamental idea of numerical integration is to estimate the area of the region in the xy-plane bounded by the graph of function f(x). The integral was esimated by divide x to small intervals, then add all the small approximations to give a total approximation. Read More: 468 Words Totally

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Chromosome bias in R, my notebook

December 23, 2010
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Chromosome bias in R, my notebook

My goal is to develop a means of detecting chromosome bias from a human BAM file.Because I've been working with proprietary and novel plant genomes for the last three years, I haven't had the chance to use any of the awesome UCSC-based annotational features that have been introduced and refined in Bioconductor until now. I've returned to biomedical research...

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Chromosome bias in R, my notebook

December 23, 2010
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Chromosome bias in R, my notebook

My goal is to develop a means of detecting chromosome bias from a human BAM file.Because I've been working with proprietary and novel plant genomes for the last three years, I haven't had the chance to use any of the awesome UCSC-based annotational features that have been introduced and refined in Bioconductor until now. I've returned to biomedical research...

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Project Euler — Problem 187

December 23, 2010
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http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=187 A composite is a number containing at least two prime factors. For example, 15 = 3 × 5; 9 = 3 × 3; 12 = 2 × 2 × 3. There are ten composites below thirty containing precisely two, not necessarily distinct, prime factors: 4, 6, 9, 10, 14, 15, 21, 22, 25, 26. Read...

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Project Euler — Problem 187

December 23, 2010
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http://projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=187 A composite is a number containing at least two prime factors. For example, 15 = 3 × 5; 9 = 3 × 3; 12 = 2 × 2 × 3. There are ten composites below thirty containing precisely two, not necessarily distinct, prime factors: 4, 6, 9, 10, 14, 15, 21, 22, 25, 26. Read...

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Area plots unmasked

December 15, 2010
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Area plots unmasked

RESULTS OF THE GREAT AREA PLOT QUIZ If you are the type of reader who remembers things from last week, you may remember the great area plot quiz we had running. This week, we are excited to announce that the results are in. The plot above shows answers to the four questions. The correct answers

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Once again, chart critics and graph gurus welcome

December 10, 2010
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Once again, chart critics and graph gurus welcome

HOW TO DISPLAY A LINE PLOT WITH COUNT INFORMATION? In a previously-mentioned paper Sharad and your DSN editor are writing up, there is the above line plot with points. The area of each point shows the count of observations. It’s done in R with ggplot2 (hooray for Hadley). We generally like this type of plot,

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New paper: Survival analysis

December 8, 2010
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New paper: Survival analysis

Each year I try to carry out some statistical consultancy to give me experience in other areas of statistics and also to provide teaching examples. Last Christmas I was approached by a paediatric consultant from the RVI who wanted to carry out prospective survival analysis. The consultant, Bruce  Jaffray, had performed Nissen fundoplication surgery on

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Google AI Challenge: Scores/Rank by Language

December 8, 2010
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Google AI Challenge: Scores/Rank by Language

A quick follow up to the previous post: about the the scores in the 2010 Google AI competition relative to programming language.  The chart above makes each language visible and discrete - and the scales are the same.library(ggplot2)df<- read.c...

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Google AI Challenge: Scores/Rank by Language

December 8, 2010
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Google AI Challenge: Scores/Rank by Language

A quick follow up to the previous post: about the the scores in the 2010 Google AI competition relative to programming language.  The chart above makes each language visible and discrete - and the scales are the same.library(ggplot2)df<- read.c...

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