2260 search results for "Twitter"

Makefiles and Sweave

May 12, 2011
By
Makefiles and Sweave

A Makefile is a simple text file that controls compilation of a target file. The key benefit of using Makefile is that it uses file time stamps to determine if a particular action is needed. In this post we discuss how to use a simple Makefile that compiles a tex file that contains a number

Read more »

One-way ANOVAs in R – including post-hocs/t-tests and graphs

May 11, 2011
By
One-way ANOVAs in R – including post-hocs/t-tests and graphs

In this post, I go over the basics of running an ANOVA using R. The dataset I’ll be examining comes from this website, and I’ve discussed it previously (starting here and then here). I’ve not seen many examples where someone runs through the … Continue reading →

Read more »

A clock utility, via console hackery

May 11, 2011
By
A clock utility, via console hackery

A discussion on StackOverflow today shows an interesting use of special characters inside the cat function. The most common special characters that you may have come across are the tab and newline characters, represented by \t and \n respectively. Try them for yourself. cat("Red\tlorry\nYellow\tlorry\n") cat also respects the backspace character, \b, and the carriage return

Read more »

Publishing in Veterinary Academic Journals

May 10, 2011
By
Publishing in Veterinary Academic Journals

Following the post by Arthur Charpentier (Freakonometrics), I wondered what would be the outcome considering my current engagement (veterinary medicine, epidemiology, bovine mastitis). Briefly, Arthur Charpentier’s post looked at clusters of journals publishing the same kind of papers. So I looked at 25 journals (Journal of Dairy Science, Canadian Journal of Veterinary Medicine, Preventive Veterinary

Read more »

ABC model choice by DIC

May 10, 2011
By
ABC model choice by DIC

Yet another paper on ABC model choice was posted on arXiv a few days ago, just prior to the ABC in London meeting that ended in the pub above (most conveniently located next to my B&B!). It is written by Olivier Francois and Guillaume Laval and the approach relies on DIC for running model selection.

Read more »

Data Science Toolset discussion at Data Scientist Summit

May 10, 2011
By

Heads-up to anyone attending the sold-out Data Science Summit in Las Vegas this week: I'll be there tomorrow and Thursday for the conference and to discuss R on the panel discussion "Data Science Toolset - Recipes That Win" (more details about the panel discussion below.) I'm looking forward to meeting with the other R users there -- tweet or...

Read more »

Accessing Databases From R

May 9, 2011
By
Accessing Databases From R

Jeffrey Breen put together a useful slideshow on accessing databases from R. I use RODBC every single day to access my own local MySQL server from R. I've had trouble with RMySQL, so I've always used RODBC instead after setting up my localhost MySQL se...

Read more »

Charting the Defeat of AV using R (and some ggplot2 and merge operations on top)

May 8, 2011
By
Charting the Defeat of AV using R (and some ggplot2 and merge operations on top)

In this post, I’ll be graphing some results from a recent referendum held here in the UK and combining it with the results of a set of local elections that were held at the same time. I’ll give some examples of graphing stuff using ggplot2 and will also show some info regarding merging datasets. At

Read more »

Slides: “Accessing Databases from R” #rstats

May 7, 2011
By
Slides: “Accessing Databases from R” #rstats

For the past few meetings of the Greater Boston useR Group, we have been opened with an introductory “useR Vignette” talk on a topic which may be helpful for new R users. This week, I presented an overview of accessing databases from R. Several people have tweeted and blogged nice things about my talk and

Read more »

R you ready for this? Statistics for free!

May 7, 2011
By
R you ready for this? Statistics for free!

If you’ve listened to the show for a while or if you’ve been reading the paleocave blog from the beginning (like when we actually used to update it regularly), then you might know that I’m rather fascinated with statistics. Imagine my delight a few years ago when I found out that one of the most

Read more »