Blog Archives

Barchart or Dotchart?

September 7, 2010
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Barchart or Dotchart?

Which of the following two charts (both created with R) to you prefer? This dotchart: Or this bar chart? Andrew Gelman (who, incidentally, is speaking at the October NYC UseR meeting) prefers the dotchart prefers a line plot (update: see Gelman's comment, below), but personally I think the bar chart is more easily interpreted. What do you think? You...

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Competition: Data Visualization with ggplot2

September 3, 2010
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Competition: Data Visualization with ggplot2

The ggplot2 package for R is an amazing system for creating entirely new visualizations of data. It allows data analysts to tell a detailed, meaningful and yet easy-to-interpret story about complex and/or unusual data sets. To promote more data stories being told, ggplot2 author Hadley Wickham has organized a ggplot2 case study competition. Simply create a new visualization of...

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New R User Group in New Jersey

September 2, 2010
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Folks in the New Jersey area no longer need to trek over to New York City to meet other R users. Now there's NewJerseyR, a new R user group put together by Mango Solutions. The first meeting will in Iselin on September 16, with speakers from Mango, Pfizer, and Bristol Myers Squibb. Full details at the NewJerseyR website, linked...

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How to generate correlated random numbers

September 1, 2010
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We've covered how to generate random numbers in R before, but what if you want to go beyond generating one random number at a time? What if you want to generate two, or three or more random numbers, and what's more, you want them to be correlated? JD Long lays out the way in a couple of posts at...

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R is indispensable, because it’s reproducible

August 31, 2010
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Maria Wolters, self-styled "Science-Mum of two" and speech and language technology researcher, has a great blog post about the one tool she couldn't live without: R. Maria says R is her "favourite tool for analysing experimental results and modelling the resulting patterns of behaviour and preferences", and explains why: R is a programming language for everything statistical. It’s free,...

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Wanted: R Analysis of New Scientist Covers

August 30, 2010
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Wanted: R Analysis of New Scientist Covers

Peter Aldhous and Jim Giles -- from New Scientist's San Francisco bureau -- are looking for a statistician and R user to take part in an interesting data analysis challenge, and also be part of a future article in the magazine. They were inspired by this rather tongue-in-cheek presentation where Sebastian Wernicke analyzed videos, transcripts and ratings of TED...

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Because it’s Friday: How Machines Work

August 27, 2010
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Because it’s Friday: How Machines Work

Ever wondered how a sewing machine seemingly manages to knot stitches without ever releasing the thread? Well, wonder no more: Find this and other animations of marvels of engineering, including the universal velocity joint and the rotary engine, at the link below. World Of Technology: Complicated Mechanisms Explained in simple animations (via) http://mytechnologyworld9.blogspot.com/2010/08/complicated-mechanisms-explained-in.html

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Poll: Half of SAS users considering a switch

August 27, 2010
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A recent poll of KD Nuggets readers suggests that of those using SAS today, almost half (49.6%) are considering switching to a different system for statistical analysis. The poll was prompted by the recent high court decision in the UK, that affirmed that "WPS is lawful clone of SAS system" (as stated in a WPS press release). The exact...

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New R User Groups in Seoul, Denver

August 26, 2010
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We have two new local R user groups to report this week. In Seoul, South Korea R user Chel Hee Lee is the organizer of the GNU R User's Group and Open Statistics Project in Korea. My translate-fu isn't quite up to figuring out when the next meeting is, but you can contact the group organizers here or here....

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Online Certificate Courses in Computational Finance with R

August 25, 2010
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As announced on the R-Sig-Finance mailing list, the University of Washington is now offering a three-course online certificate in computational finance, using the R programming language as the software base. The three courses are: Investment Science R Computing for Computational Finance Portfolio Construction and Risk Management The course is presented by Doug Martin (founder of S-PLUS and longtime computational...

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