Blog Archives

Video: Visualizing data in R using ggplot2

December 28, 2009
By

At the most recent New York R User Group meetup, the topic was creating graphics in R with the ggplot2 package. Drew Conway's talk, "Making pretty pictures with ggplot2" gave several practical examples of visualizing data with ggplot2 and is well worth checking out: You can follow along with Drew's slides, which are downloadable from his blog. (Update: you...

Read more »

Merry Christmas using R

December 25, 2009
By

Yihui creates an Christmas greeting using R: See the R code to create an animated message in Flash here: Keep on Fighting: Merry Christmas Using R

Read more »

Because it’s Christmas: Microbe Mario

December 25, 2009
By
Because it’s Christmas: Microbe Mario

He's no Father Christmas, but he is dressed in festive red and green, and he's made of bacteria. This image, Mario, was submitted to the 2009 international Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition by Team Osaka from the nanobiology laboratories at the University of Osaka, Japan. They genetically engineered bacteria to express fluorescent proteins and carotenoid pigments to create works...

Read more »

A web-based graphics application based on R

December 24, 2009
By
A web-based graphics application based on R

FlowingData recently took a look at Jeroen Ooms' latest web-based statistical tool based on R. We've looked at his tools for random-effects models and finance visualizations before, but this one is a more general tool for creating graphs from data sets using the ggplot2 package. It's pretty slick. All you need to do is upload a data set (in...

Read more »

R in India: The Hindu

December 23, 2009
By

The Hindu, a leading English-language newspaper in India, published an article on December 21 about doing research with open-source tools and R got a prominent mention: Though commercial statistical packages are popular among researchers, their licensing costs drive people away from them. In this context, R http://www.r-project.org, the open source/free statistical package, which is fast becoming the darling of...

Read more »

Forecasting the weather with R

December 22, 2009
By
Forecasting the weather with R

The US National Centers for Environment Prediction (NCEP) produces weather forecasts for the entire world from a model that's updated every 6 hours. The data is made freely available, and with a couple of free tools to convert the data and R you can easily produce am unpdated global weather forecast like this (click to enlarge): (Check out the...

Read more »

Singapore, February 19-20: Computational Topics in Finance

December 21, 2009
By

With all of the winter snows in the US this weekend, a trip to equatorial climes sounds pretty good right about now. That makes this email announcement from Rmetrics leader Diethelm Wuertz all the more tempting: Conference on 'Computational Topics in Finance' February 19/20, 2010, National University of Singapore Dear R/Rmetrics Community, We would like to announce the first...

Read more »

Because it’s Friday: The decline of empires

December 18, 2009
By

Here's a neat visualization of the decline of the British, Spanish, Portugese and French empires from 1800 to present day. It's definitely more art than stats -- judging by the relative size of India and Australia I think the circles are scaled to area, not population -- but it definitely does capture the drama and the ebb and flow...

Read more »

Why use plyr?

December 17, 2009
By

The "apply" family of functions in R (apply, sapply, lapply) is a very powerful suite of tools for iterating through structures of data and returning the combined results of each iteration. But with great power comes great responsibility (or something like that): these functions can sometimes be frustratingly difficult to get working exactly as you intended, especially for newcomers...

Read more »

According to Microsoft, the fourth paradigm of science is data

December 16, 2009
By

In scientific discovery, the first three paradigms were experimental, theoretical and (more recently) computational science. A new book of essays published by Microsoft (and available for free download -- kudos, MS!) argues that a fourth paradigm of scientific discovery is at hand: the analysis of massive data sets. The book is dedicated to the late Microsoft researcher Dr Jim...

Read more »