Blog Archives

Time-based internet advertising

July 20, 2012
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Time-based internet advertising

Last week it was announced that Facebook is rotating its ads after a certain time of exposure. Sid Suri, Preston McAfee, and Dan Goldstein's research may have been the source of this idea. In 2011 and 2012 the trio published a couple papers putting for and improving the idea. The post Time-based internet advertising appeared first on Decision Science...

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How to square numbers in your head

March 2, 2012
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How to square numbers in your head

MENTALLY MULTIPLY NUMBERS BY THEMSELVES Assume you know your multiplication tables up to 10x10. Here's how to compute the squares of numbers from 11 to 100.

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Some code to help you remember numbers

January 17, 2012
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Some code to help you remember numbers

Two posts ago we showed you the digit sound system for remembering numbers. This week we provide two computer programs to help you create mnemonics.

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You’ve got the whole world in your portfolio

December 29, 2011
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You’ve got the whole world in your portfolio

A famous finance professor once told us that good diversification meant holding everything in the world. Fine, but in what proportion? Suppose you could invest in every country in the world. How much would you invest in each? In a market-capitalization weighted index, you'd invest in each country in proportion to the market value of its investments (its "market capitalization")....

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Keep your files in sync for free

November 19, 2011
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Keep your files in sync for free

It is not uncommon to have two computers at work, four at home and a server out on the wild, wild internet (that's what we have, anyway ... wait, we forgot one in London). How to keep all these files in sync? Here are our file synchronization tips.

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Do cents follow Benford’s Law?

October 5, 2011
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Do cents follow Benford’s Law?

Benford's law is an amazing thing. If you know the probability distribution that classes of "natural" numbers should have, you can detect where people might be faking data: phony tax returns, bogus scientific studies, etc.

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Dollars and cents: How are you at estimating the total bill?

September 30, 2011
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Dollars and cents: How are you at estimating the total bill?

When estimating the cost of a bunch of purchases, a useful heuristic is rounding to the nearest dollar. (In fact, on US income tax returns, one is allowed to omit the cents). If prices were uniformly distributed, the following two heuristics would be equally accurate: * Rounding each item up or down to the nearest dollar and summing * Rounding each...

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How many NYC restaurants get As on their health inspections?

August 15, 2011
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How many NYC restaurants get As on their health inspections?

Decision Science News is no stranger to misleading infographics in free New York newspapers. We could stop reading them entirely, but we find that playing "spot the infographic flaw" makes time fly on the subway. Recently we saw the above graphic in a paper called Metro. Can you spot the goof?

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On not going viral

August 1, 2011
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On not going viral

This week the reader is directed to Messy Matters to read up on research conducted by Sharad Goel, Duncan Watts and Dan Goldstein in which they hunted for traces of "viral" diffusion on Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo!, and beyond. The results run counter to mainstream intuition.

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Best graph ever

July 3, 2011
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Best graph ever

Best graph ever. LARGEST EVER DIFFERENCE BETWEEN 328 and 327 SPOTTED IN NEW YORK CITY

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