a public list of R freelancers

December 4, 2013
By

(This article was first published on isomorphismes, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

tl,dr: If you want to be contacted for freelance R work, edit this list https://github.com/isomorphisms/hire-an-r-programmer/blob/master/README.md.

 

Background/Problem: I was looking for a list of R-programming freelancers and realised there is no such list.

Other than famous people and people I already talk to, I don’t know even a small fraction of the R community—let alone people who do R among other things and don’t participate in the mailing lists or chatrooms I do.

This is actually a more general problem since anyone looking to hire an R programmer will find a wall of tutorials if they http://google.com/search?q=hire+an+r+programmer.

 

Solution: I thought about making a publicly-editable website where freelancers can put their contact info, specialty areas, links to projects, preferred kind of work, rates, and so on.

Of course, I’d have to make the login system. And validate users. And fight spam. And think up some database models, change the fields if someone suggests something better…. And it would be nice to link to StackOverflow, Github, CRAN, and …

The more I thought about it the more I favoured a solution where someone else does all the work. GitHub already has a validation system, usernames, logins, and a publicly editable “wiki”. MVP. No maintenance, no vetting, no development. GitHub already shows up in google so whoever searches for “hire an R programmer” will find you if you put your details there.

It’s actually unbelievable that we’ve had R-Bloggers as a gathering place for so long, but nowhere central to list who’s looking for work.

So I committed https://github.com/isomorphisms/hire-an-r-programmer/blob/master/README.md which is a markdown file you can add your information to, if you want to be found by recruiters who are looking for R programmers. Forking is a good design pattern for this purpose as well. Add whatever information you want, and if you think I’m missing some fields you can add those as well. Suggestions/comments also welcome below.

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on his blog: isomorphismes.

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