Posts Tagged ‘ S&P 500 ’

A slice of S&P 500 kurtosis history

February 13, 2012
By
A slice of S&P 500 kurtosis history

How fat tailed are returns, and how does it change over time? Previously The sister post of this one is “A slice of S&P 500 skewness history”. Orientation The word “kurtosis” is a bit weird.  The original idea was of peakedness — how peaked is the distribution at the center.  That’s what we can see, … Continue reading...

Read more »

A slice of S&P 500 skewness history

January 16, 2012
By
A slice of S&P 500 skewness history

How symmetric are the returns of the S&P 500? How does the skewness change over time? Previously We looked at the predictability of kurtosis and skewness in S&P constituents.  We didn’t see any predictability of skewness among the constituents.  Here we look at skewness from a different angle. The data Daily log returns of the … Continue reading...

Read more »

Volatility estimation and time-adjusted returns

December 15, 2011
By
Volatility estimation and time-adjusted returns

Do non-trading days explain the mystery of volatility estimation? Previously The post “The volatility mystery continues” showed that volatility estimated with daily data tends to be larger (in recent years) than when estimated with lower frequency returns. Time adjusting One of the comments — from Joseph Wilson — was that there is a problem with … Continue reading...

Read more »

The volatility mystery continues

December 5, 2011
By
The volatility mystery continues

How do volatility estimates based on monthly versus daily returns differ? Previously The post “The mystery of volatility estimates from daily versus monthly returns” and its offspring “Another look at autocorrelation in the S&P 500″ discussed what appears to be an anomaly in the estimation of volatility from daily versus monthly data. In recent times … Continue reading...

Read more »

Another look at autocorrelation in the S&P 500

November 11, 2011
By
Another look at autocorrelation in the S&P 500

Casting doubt on the possibility of mean reversion in the S&P 500 lately. Previously A look at volatility estimates in “The mystery of volatility estimates from daily versus monthly returns” led to considering the possibility of autocorrelation in the returns.  I estimated an AR(1) model through time and added a naive confidence interval to the … Continue reading...

Read more »

The mystery of volatility estimates from daily versus monthly returns

November 8, 2011
By
The mystery of volatility estimates from daily versus monthly returns

What drives the estimates apart? Previously A post by Investment Performance Guy prompted “Variability of volatility estimates from daily data”. In my comments to the original post I suggested that using daily data to estimate volatility would be equivalent to using monthly data except with less variability.  Dave, the Investment Performance Guy, proposed the exquisitely … Continue reading...

Read more »

Does the S&P 500 exhibit seasonality through the year?

October 20, 2011
By
Does the S&P 500 exhibit seasonality through the year?

Are there times of the year when returns are better or worse? Abnormal Returns prompted this question with “SAD and the Halloween indicator” in which it is claimed that the US market tends to outperform from about Halloween until April. Data The data consisted of 15,548 daily returns of the S&P 500 starting in 1950.  … Continue reading...

Read more »

Predictability of kurtosis and skewness in S&P constituents

October 3, 2011
By
Predictability of kurtosis and skewness in S&P constituents

How much predictability is there for these higher moments? Data The data consist of daily returns from the start of 2007 through mid 2011 for almost all of the S&P 500 constituents. Estimates were made over each half year of data.  Hence there are 8 pairs of estimates where one estimate immediately follows the other. … Continue reading...

Read more »

Beta and expected returns

September 16, 2011
By
Beta and expected returns

Some pictures to explore the reality of the theory that stocks with higher beta should have higher expected returns. Figure 2 of “The effect of beta equal 1″ shows the return-beta relationship as downward sloping.  That’s a sample of size 1.  In this post we add six more datapoints. Data The exact same betas of … Continue reading...

Read more »

The indices understate the carnage

August 9, 2011
By
The indices understate the carnage

The first 6 trading days of August have been bad for the major indices, but how variable is that across portfolios? To answer that, two sets of random portfolios were generated from the constituents of the S&P 500.  The trading days are 2011 August 1 — 5 and 8. The returns of the indices for … Continue reading...

Read more »

Sponsors

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)