Source code chapter added to “Evidence-based software engineering using R”

July 31, 2018
By

(This article was first published on The Shape of Code » R, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

The Source Code chapter of my evidence-based software engineering book has been added to the draft pdf (download here).

This chapter has suffered from coming last and there is still lots of work to be done. Almost all the source code related data has been plundered to fill up earlier chapters. Some data did not make the cut-off for release of the draft; a global review will probably result in some data migrating back to this chapter.

When talking to developers about the book I am constantly being asked ‘what is empirical software engineering?’ My explanation uses the phrase ‘evidence-based’, which everybody seems to immediately understand. It is counterproductive having a title that has to be explained, so I have changed the title to “Evidence-based Software Engineering using R”.

What is the purpose of a chapter discussing source code in a book on evidence-based software engineering? Source code is obviously an essential component of the topics discussed in the other chapters, but what is so particular to source code that it could not be said elsewhere? Having spent most of my professional life studying source code, first as a compiler writer and then involved with static analysis, am I just being driven by an attachment to the subject?

My view of source code is very different from most other developers: when developers talk about code, they spend most of the time talking about how they do things, when I talk about code I spend most of the time talking about how other developers do things (I’m a mongrel writer of code). Developers’ blinkered view of code prevents them seeing bigger pictures. I take a Gricean view of code and refrain from using meaningless marketing terms such as maintainability, readability and testability.

I have lots of source code data of interest to compiler writers (who are not the target audience) and I have lots of data related to static analysis (tool developers are not the audience). The target audience is professional software developers and hopefully what has been written is of interest to that readership.

I have been promised all sorts of data. Hopefully some of it will arrive. If somebody tells you they promised to send me data, please encourage them to take some time to sort out the data and send it.

As always, if you know of any interesting software engineering data, please tell me.

Finalizing the statistical analysis material in the second half of the book (released almost two years ago) next.

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: The Shape of Code » R.

R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials on topics such as: Data science, Big Data, R jobs, visualization (ggplot2, Boxplots, maps, animation), programming (RStudio, Sweave, LaTeX, SQL, Eclipse, git, hadoop, Web Scraping) statistics (regression, PCA, time series, trading) and more...



If you got this far, why not subscribe for updates from the site? Choose your flavor: e-mail, twitter, RSS, or facebook...

Comments are closed.

Search R-bloggers

Sponsors

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)