“Print hello”​ is not enough. A collection of Hello world functions.

December 15, 2017
By

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I guess I wrote my R “hello world!” function 7 or 8 years ago while approaching R for the first time. And it is too little to illustrate the basic syntax of a programming language for a working program to a wannabe R programmer. Thus, here follows a collection of basic functions that may help a bit more than the famed piece of code.

######################################################
############### Hello world functions ################
######################################################
##################################
# General info
fun <- function( arguments ) { body }


##################################
foo.add <- function(x,y){
  x+y
}

foo.add(7, 5)

----------------------------------

foo.above <- function(x){
  x[x>10]
}

foo.above(1:100)

----------------------------------

foo.above_n <- function(x,n){
  x[x>n]
}

foo.above_n(1:20, 12)

----------------------------------

foo = seq(1, 100, by=2)
foo.squared = NULL

for (i in 1:50 ) {
  foo.squared[i] = foo[i]^2
}

foo.squared

----------------------------------

a <- c(1,6,7,8,8,9,2)

s <- 0
for (i in 1:length(a)){
  s <- s + a[[i]]
}
s

----------------------------------

a <- c(1,6,7,8,8,9,2,100)

s <- 0
i <- 1
while (i <= length(a)){
  s <- s + a[[i]]
  i <- i+1
}
s

----------------------------------

FunSum <- function(a){
  s <- 0
  i <- 1
  while (i <= length(a)){
    s <- s + a[[i]]
    i <- i+1
  }
  print(s)
}

FunSum(a)

-----------------------------------

SumInt <- function(n){
  s <- 0
  for (i in 1:n){
    s <- s + i
  }
  print(s)  
}

SumInt(14)

-----------------------------------
# find the maximum
# right to left assignment
x <- c(3, 9, 7, 2)

# trick: it is necessary to use a temporary variable to allow the comparison by pairs of
# each number of the sequence, i.e. the process of comparison is incremental: each time
# a bigger number compared to the previous in the sequence is found, it is assigned as the
# temporary maximum
# Since the process has to start somewhere, the first (temporary) maximum is assigned to be
# the first number of the sequence

max <- x[1]
for(i in x){
  tmpmax = i
  if(tmpmax > max){
    max = tmpmax
  }
}

max

x <- c(-20, -14, 6, 2)
x <- c(-2, -24, -14, -7)

min <- x[1]
for(i in x){
  tmpmin = i
  if(tmpmin < min){
    min = tmpmin
  }
}

min

----------------------------------
# n is the nth Fibonacci number
# temp is the temporary variable

Fibonacci <- function(n){
  a <- 0
  b <- 1
  for(i in 1:n){
    temp <- b
    b <- a
    a <- a + temp
  }
  return(a)
}

Fibonacci(13)

----------------------------------
# R available factorial function
factorial(5)

# recursive function: ff
ff <- function(x) {
  if(x<=0) {
    return(1)
  } else {
    return(x*ff(x-1)) # function uses the fact it knows its own name to call itself
  }
}
ff(5)

----------------------------------

say_hello_to <- function(name){
  paste("Hello", name)
} 
say_hello_to("Roberto")

----------------------------------

foo.colmean <- function(y){
  nc <- ncol(y)
  means <- numeric(nc)
  for(i in 1:nc){
    means[i] <- mean(y[,i])
  }
  means
}

foo.colmean(airquality)

----------------------------------

foo.colmean <- function(y, removeNA=FALSE){
  nc <- ncol(y)
  means <- numeric(nc)
  for(i in 1:nc){
    means[i] <- mean(y[,i], na.rm=removeNA)
  }
  means
}

foo.colmean(airquality, TRUE)

----------------------------------

foo.contingency <- function(x,y){
  nc <- ncol(x)
  out <- list() 
  for (i in 1:nc){
    out[[i]] <- table(y, x[,i]) 
  }
  names(out) <- names(x)
  out
}

set.seed(123)
v1 <- sample(c(rep("a", 5), rep("b", 15), rep("c", 20)))
v2 <- sample(c(rep("d", 15), rep("e", 20), rep("f", 5)))
v3 <- sample(c(rep("g", 10), rep("h", 10), rep("k", 20)))

data <- data.frame(v1, v2, v3)

foo.contingency(data,v3)

That's all folks!

#R #rstats #maRche #Rbloggers

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