sparklyr 1.4: Weighted Sampling, Tidyr Verbs, Robust Scaler, RAPIDS, and more

[This article was first published on RStudio AI Blog, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers]. (You can report issue about the content on this page here)
Want to share your content on R-bloggers? click here if you have a blog, or here if you don't.

In this blog post, we will showcase the following much-anticipated new functionalities from the sparklyr 1.4 release:

Parallelized Weighted Sampling

Readers familiar with dplyr::sample_n() and dplyr::sample_frac() functions may have noticed that both of them support weighted-sampling use cases on R dataframes, e.g.,

dplyr::sample_n(mtcars, size = 3, weight = mpg, replace = FALSE)
               mpg cyl  disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
Fiat 128      32.4   4  78.7  66 4.08 2.200 19.47  1  1    4    1
Merc 280C     17.8   6 167.6 123 3.92 3.440 18.90  1  0    4    4
Mazda RX4 Wag 21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4

and

dplyr::sample_frac(mtcars, size = 0.1, weight = mpg, replace = FALSE)
             mpg cyl  disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
Honda Civic 30.4   4  75.7  52 4.93 1.615 18.52  1  1    4    2
Merc 450SE  16.4   8 275.8 180 3.07 4.070 17.40  0  0    3    3
Fiat X1-9   27.3   4  79.0  66 4.08 1.935 18.90  1  1    4    1

will select some random subset of mtcars using the mpg attribute as the sampling weight for each row. If replace = FALSE is set, then a row is removed from the sampling population once it gets selected, whereas when setting replace = TRUE, each row will always stay in the sampling population and can be selected multiple times.

Now the exact same use cases are supported for Spark dataframes in sparklyr 1.4! For example:

library(sparklyr)

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local")
mtcars_sdf <- copy_to(sc, mtcars, repartition = 4L)

dplyr::sample_n(mtcars_sdf, size = 5, weight = mpg, replace = FALSE)

will return a random subset of size 5 from the Spark dataframe mtcars_sdf.

More importantly, the sampling algorithm implemented in sparklyr 1.4 is something that fits perfectly into the MapReduce paradigm: as we have split our mtcars data into 4 partitions of mtcars_sdf by specifying repartition = 4L, the algorithm will first process each partition independently and in parallel, selecting a sample set of size up to 5 from each, and then reduce all 4 sample sets into a final sample set of size 5 by choosing records having the top 5 highest sampling priorities among all.

How is such parallelization possible, especially for the sampling without replacement scenario, where the desired result is defined as the outcome of a sequential process? A detailed answer to this question is in this blog post, which includes a definition of the problem (in particular, the exact meaning of sampling weights in term of probabilities), a high-level explanation of the current solution and the motivation behind it, and also, some mathematical details all hidden in one link to a PDF file, so that non-math-oriented readers can get the gist of everything else without getting scared away, while math-oriented readers can enjoy working out all the integrals themselves before peeking at the answer.

Tidyr Verbs

The specialized implementations of the following tidyr verbs that work efficiently with Spark dataframes were included as part of sparklyr 1.4:

We can demonstrate how those verbs are useful for tidying data through some examples.

Let’s say we are given mtcars_sdf, a Spark dataframe containing all rows from mtcars plus the name of each row:

library(sparklyr)

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local")
mtcars_sdf <- cbind(
  data.frame(model = rownames(mtcars)),
  data.frame(mtcars, row.names = NULL)
) %>%
  copy_to(sc, ., repartition = 4L)

print(mtcars_sdf, n = 5)
# Source: spark [?? x 12]
  model          mpg   cyl  disp    hp  drat    wt  qsec    vs    am  gear  carb
                    
1 Mazda RX4     21       6   160   110  3.9   2.62  16.5     0     1     4     4
2 Mazda RX4 W…  21       6   160   110  3.9   2.88  17.0     0     1     4     4
3 Datsun 710    22.8     4   108    93  3.85  2.32  18.6     1     1     4     1
4 Hornet 4 Dr…  21.4     6   258   110  3.08  3.22  19.4     1     0     3     1
5 Hornet Spor…  18.7     8   360   175  3.15  3.44  17.0     0     0     3     2
# … with more rows

and we would like to turn all numeric attributes in mtcar_sdf (in other words, all columns other than the model column) into key-value pairs stored in 2 columns, with the key column storing the name of each attribute, and the value column storing each attribute’s numeric value. One way to accomplish that with tidyr is by utilizing the tidyr::pivot_longer functionality:

mtcars_kv_sdf <- mtcars_sdf %>%
  tidyr::pivot_longer(cols = -model, names_to = "key", values_to = "value")
print(mtcars_kv_sdf, n = 5)
# Source: spark [?? x 3]
  model     key   value
        
1 Mazda RX4 am      1
2 Mazda RX4 carb    4
3 Mazda RX4 cyl     6
4 Mazda RX4 disp  160
5 Mazda RX4 drat    3.9
# … with more rows

To undo the effect of tidyr::pivot_longer, we can apply tidyr::pivot_wider to our mtcars_kv_sdf Spark dataframe, and get back the original data that was present in mtcars_sdf:

tbl <- mtcars_kv_sdf %>%
  tidyr::pivot_wider(names_from = key, values_from = value)
print(tbl, n = 5)
# Source: spark [?? x 12]
  model         carb   cyl  drat    hp   mpg    vs    wt    am  disp  gear  qsec
                    
1 Mazda RX4        4     6  3.9    110  21       0  2.62     1  160      4  16.5
2 Hornet 4 Dr…     1     6  3.08   110  21.4     1  3.22     0  258      3  19.4
3 Hornet Spor…     2     8  3.15   175  18.7     0  3.44     0  360      3  17.0
4 Merc 280C        4     6  3.92   123  17.8     1  3.44     0  168.     4  18.9
5 Merc 450SLC      3     8  3.07   180  15.2     0  3.78     0  276.     3  18
# … with more rows

Another way to reduce many columns into fewer ones is by using tidyr::nest to move some columns into nested tables. For instance, we can create a nested table perf encapsulating all performance-related attributes from mtcars (namely, hp, mpg, disp, and qsec). However, unlike R dataframes, Spark Dataframes do not have the concept of nested tables, and the closest to nested tables we can get is a perf column containing named structs with hp, mpg, disp, and qsec attributes:

mtcars_nested_sdf <- mtcars_sdf %>%
  tidyr::nest(perf = c(hp, mpg, disp, qsec))

We can then inspect the type of perf column in mtcars_nested_sdf:

sdf_schema(mtcars_nested_sdf)$perf$type
[1] "ArrayType(StructType(StructField(hp,DoubleType,true), StructField(mpg,DoubleType,true), StructField(disp,DoubleType,true), StructField(qsec,DoubleType,true)),true)"

and inspect individual struct elements within perf:

perf <- mtcars_nested_sdf %>% dplyr::pull(perf)
unlist(perf[[1]])
    hp    mpg   disp   qsec
110.00  21.00 160.00  16.46

Finally, we can also use tidyr::unnest to undo the effects of tidyr::nest:

mtcars_unnested_sdf <- mtcars_nested_sdf %>%
  tidyr::unnest(col = perf)
print(mtcars_unnested_sdf, n = 5)
# Source: spark [?? x 12]
  model          cyl  drat    wt    vs    am  gear  carb    hp   mpg  disp  qsec
                    
1 Mazda RX4        6  3.9   2.62     0     1     4     4   110  21    160   16.5
2 Hornet 4 Dr…     6  3.08  3.22     1     0     3     1   110  21.4  258   19.4
3 Duster 360       8  3.21  3.57     0     0     3     4   245  14.3  360   15.8
4 Merc 280         6  3.92  3.44     1     0     4     4   123  19.2  168.  18.3
5 Lincoln Con…     8  3     5.42     0     0     3     4   215  10.4  460   17.8
# … with more rows

Robust Scaler

RobustScaler is a new functionality introduced in Spark 3.0 (SPARK-28399). Thanks to a pull request by @zero323, an R interface for RobustScaler, namely, the ft_robust_scaler() function, is now part of sparklyr.

It is often observed that many machine learning algorithms perform better on numeric inputs that are standardized. Many of us have learned in stats 101 that given a random variable \(X\), we can compute its mean \(\mu = E[X]\), standard deviation \(\sigma = \sqrt{E[X^2] - (E[X])^2}\), and then obtain a standard score \(z = \frac{X - \mu}{\sigma}\) which has mean of 0 and standard deviation of 1.

However, notice both \(E[X]\) and \(E[X^2]\) from above are quantities that can be easily skewed by extreme outliers in \(X\), causing distortions in \(z\). A particular bad case of it would be if all non-outliers among \(X\) are very close to \(0\), hence making \(E[X]\) close to \(0\), while extreme outliers are all far in the negative direction, hence dragging down \(E[X]\) while skewing \(E[X^2]\) upwards.

An alternative way of standardizing \(X\) based on its median, 1st quartile, and 3rd quartile values, all of which are robust against outliers, would be the following:

\(\displaystyle z = \frac{X - \text{Median}(X)}{\text{P75}(X) - \text{P25}(X)}\)

and this is precisely what RobustScaler offers.

To see ft_robust_scaler() in action and demonstrate its usefulness, we can go through a contrived example consisting of the following steps:

  • Draw 500 random samples from the standard normal distribution
sample_values <- rnorm(500)
print(sample_values)
  [1] -0.626453811  0.183643324 -0.835628612  1.595280802  0.329507772
  [6] -0.820468384  0.487429052  0.738324705  0.575781352 -0.305388387
  ...
  • Inspect the minimal and maximal values among the \(500\) random samples:
print(min(sample_values))
  [1] -3.008049
print(max(sample_values))
  [1] 3.810277
  • Now create \(10\) other values that are extreme outliers compared to the \(500\) random samples above. Given that we know all \(500\) samples are within the range of \((-4, 4)\), we can choose \(-501, -502, \ldots, -509, -510\) as our \(10\) outliers:
outliers <- -500L - seq(10)
  • Copy all \(510\) values into a Spark dataframe named sdf
library(sparklyr)

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local", version = "3.0.0")
sdf <- copy_to(sc, data.frame(value = c(sample_values, outliers)))
  • We can then apply ft_robust_scaler() to obtain the standardized value for each input:
scaled <- sdf %>%
  ft_vector_assembler("value", "input") %>%
  ft_robust_scaler("input", "scaled") %>%
  dplyr::pull(scaled) %>%
  unlist()
  • Plotting the result shows the non-outlier data points being scaled to values that still more or less form a bell-shaped distribution centered around \(0\), as expected, so the scaling is robust against influence of the outliers:
library(ggplot2)

ggplot(data.frame(scaled = scaled), aes(x = scaled)) +
  xlim(-7, 7) +
  geom_histogram(binwidth = 0.2)

  • Finally, we can compare the distribution of the scaled values above with the distribution of z-scores of all input values, and notice how scaling the input with only mean and standard deviation would have caused noticeable skewness – which the robust scaler has successfully avoided:
all_values <- c(sample_values, outliers)
z_scores <- (all_values - mean(all_values)) / sd(all_values)
ggplot(data.frame(scaled = z_scores), aes(x = scaled)) +
  xlim(-0.05, 0.2) +
  geom_histogram(binwidth = 0.005)

  • From the 2 plots above, one can observe while both standardization processes produced some distributions that were still bell-shaped, the one produced by ft_robust_scaler() is centered around \(0\), correctly indicating the average among all non-outlier values, while the z-score distribution is clearly not centered around \(0\) as its center has been noticeably shifted by the \(10\) outlier values.

RAPIDS

Readers following Apache Spark releases closely probably have noticed the recent addition of RAPIDS GPU acceleration support in Spark 3.0. Catching up with this recent development, an option to enable RAPIDS in Spark connections was also created in sparklyr and shipped in sparklyr 1.4. On a host with RAPIDS-capable hardware (e.g., an Amazon EC2 instance of type ‘p3.2xlarge’), one can install sparklyr 1.4 and observe RAPIDS hardware acceleration being reflected in Spark SQL physical query plans:

library(sparklyr)

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local", version = "3.0.0", packages = "rapids")
dplyr::db_explain(sc, "SELECT 4")
== Physical Plan ==
*(2) GpuColumnarToRow false
+- GpuProject [4 AS 4#45]
   +- GpuRowToColumnar TargetSize(2147483647)
      +- *(1) Scan OneRowRelation[]

All newly introduced higher-order functions from Spark 3.0, such as array_sort() with custom comparator, transform_keys(), transform_values(), and map_zip_with(), are supported by sparklyr 1.4.

In addition, all higher-order functions can now be accessed directly through dplyr rather than their hof_* counterparts in sparklyr. This means, for example, that we can run the following dplyr queries to calculate the square of all array elements in column x of sdf, and then sort them in descending order:

library(sparklyr)

sc <- spark_connect(master = "local", version = "3.0.0")
sdf <- copy_to(sc, tibble::tibble(x = list(c(-3, -2, 1, 5), c(6, -7, 5, 8))))

sq_desc <- sdf %>%
  dplyr::mutate(x = transform(x, ~ .x * .x)) %>%
  dplyr::mutate(x = array_sort(x, ~ as.integer(sign(.y - .x)))) %>%
  dplyr::pull(x)

print(sq_desc)
[[1]]
[1] 25  9  4  1

[[2]]
[1] 64 49 36 25

Acknowledgement

In chronological order, we would like to thank the following individuals for their contributions to sparklyr 1.4:

We also appreciate bug reports, feature requests, and valuable other feedback about sparklyr from our awesome open-source community (e.g., the weighted sampling feature in sparklyr 1.4 was largely motivated by this Github issue filed by @ajing, and some dplyr-related bug fixes in this release were initiated in #2648 and completed with this pull request by @wkdavis).

Last but not least, the author of this blog post is extremely grateful for fantastic editorial suggestions from @javierluraschi, @batpigandme, and @skeydan.

If you wish to learn more about sparklyr, we recommend checking out sparklyr.ai, spark.rstudio.com, and also some of the previous release posts such as sparklyr 1.3 and sparklyr 1.2.

Thanks for reading!

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: RStudio AI Blog.

R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials about learning R and many other topics. Click here if you're looking to post or find an R/data-science job.
Want to share your content on R-bloggers? click here if you have a blog, or here if you don't.

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)