Random Walk of Pi – Another ggplot2 Experiment

[This article was first published on R on Chi's Impe[r]fect Blog, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers]. (You can report issue about the content on this page here)
Want to share your content on R-bloggers? click here if you have a blog, or here if you don't.

There are so many beautiful “π” arts everywhere, and I wanted to practice ggplot2 by mimicing those arts further more. Another pi art caught my eye is random walk of pi digits. Here’s one of examples in WIRED magazine.

For random walk to work, I’ve assigned direction to “walk” depending on digits 0-9.

I’ve prepared data frame as below, so I can use ggplot2 to plot

## pi_df contains first 100K digits , each digit is stored in one row.

df_walk <- pi_df %>% 
  mutate(pos = row_number()-1, ## assign position
         dig= as.numeric(dig)) %>%
  select(pos, dig) %>%
  mutate(angle_rad = 2*pi/10*dig,  ## using current digit determine direction to move
         angle_deg = circular::deg(angle_rad), ## I just like to see number in degree...
         move_x = cos(angle_rad), ## how much to move in x direction
         move_y = sin(angle_rad), ## how much to move in y direction
         last_x = replace_na(lag(move_x),0), ## position of last x, set origin as 0
         last_y = replace_na(lag(move_y),0), ## position of last y, set origin as 0
         cumsum_x = cumsum(move_x), ## walkig == adding up all steps in x
         cumsum_y = cumsum(move_y), ## walking == adding up all steps in y
         cumsum_x_lag = cumsum(last_x),
         cumsum_y_lag = cumsum(last_y)) 

df_walk %>% head(n=5) %>% knitr::kable()

pos dig angle_rad angle_deg move_x move_y last_x last_y cumsum_x cumsum_y cumsum_x_lag cumsum_y_lag
0 3 1.8849556 108 -0.309017 0.9510565 0.000000 0.0000000 -0.309017 0.9510565 0.000000 0.0000000
1 1 0.6283185 36 0.809017 0.5877853 -0.309017 0.9510565 0.500000 1.5388418 -0.309017 0.9510565
2 4 2.5132741 144 -0.809017 0.5877853 0.809017 0.5877853 -0.309017 2.1266270 0.500000 1.5388418
3 1 0.6283185 36 0.809017 0.5877853 -0.809017 0.5877853 0.500000 2.7144123 -0.309017 2.1266270
4 5 3.1415927 180 -1.000000 0.0000000 0.809017 0.5877853 -0.500000 2.7144123 0.500000 2.7144123

Now to visualize the random walk, I’ve used below script to visualize first 1000, first 10000 and first 100000 digits of pi.

n_steps <- 1000
## Random Walk of Pi
df_walk %>% 
  filter(pos < n_steps) %>%
  ggplot(aes(x=cumsum_x, y=cumsum_y, color=pos)) + 
  geom_segment(size=0.5, aes(xend=cumsum_x_lag, yend=cumsum_y_lag)) +
  geom_point(size=0.8) + 
  theme_void(base_family="Roboto Condensed") +
  theme(panel.background=element_rect(fill="#000000")) +
  scale_color_viridis_c(option="plasma", guide="none") +
  labs(caption=paste("First",n_steps,"digits of Pi"))  +
  geom_hline(yintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3) +
  geom_vline(xintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3)

#ggsave(str_c("output/random_walk_pi_",n_steps,".png"), width=11, height=7)


n_steps <- 10000
## Random Walk of Pi
df_walk %>% 
  filter(pos < n_steps) %>%
  ggplot(aes(x=cumsum_x, y=cumsum_y, color=pos)) + 
  geom_segment(size=0.1, aes(xend=cumsum_x_lag, yend=cumsum_y_lag)) +
  geom_point(size=0.01) + 
  theme_void(base_family="Roboto Condensed") +
  theme(panel.background=element_rect(fill="#000000")) +
  scale_color_viridis_c(option="plasma", guide="none") +
  labs(caption=paste("First",n_steps,"digits of Pi"))  +
  geom_hline(yintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3) +
  geom_vline(xintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3)

n_steps <- 100000
## Random Walk of Pi
df_walk %>% 
  filter(pos < n_steps) %>%
  ggplot(aes(x=cumsum_x, y=cumsum_y, color=pos)) + 
  geom_segment(size=0.1, aes(xend=cumsum_x_lag, yend=cumsum_y_lag)) +
  geom_point(size=0.005) + 
  theme_void(base_family="Roboto Condensed") +
  theme(panel.background=element_rect(fill="#000000")) +
  scale_color_viridis_c(option="plasma", guide="none") +
  labs(caption=paste("First 100000 digits of Pi"))  +
  geom_hline(yintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3) +
  geom_vline(xintercept=0, color="#ffffff30", linetype=3)

To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: R on Chi's Impe[r]fect Blog.

R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials about learning R and many other topics. Click here if you're looking to post or find an R/data-science job.
Want to share your content on R-bloggers? click here if you have a blog, or here if you don't.

Never miss an update!
Subscribe to R-bloggers to receive
e-mails with the latest R posts.
(You will not see this message again.)

Click here to close (This popup will not appear again)