Monthly Archives: February 2013

Incorporating Preference Construction into the Choice Modeling Process

February 15, 2013
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Statistical modeling often begins with the response generation process because data analysis is a combination of mathematics and substantive theory.  It is a theory of how things work that determines how we ought to collect and analyze&n...

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Clustering Loss Development Factors

February 15, 2013
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Clustering Loss Development Factors

  Anytime I get a new hammer, I waste no time in trying to find something to bash with it. Prior to last year, I wouldn’t have known what a cluster was, other than the first half of a slang term used to describe a poor decision-making process. Now I’ve seen it in action a

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Zurich, Feb 2013 – Basic R Course

February 15, 2013
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(This article was first published on Rmetrics blogs, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers) To leave a comment for the author, please follow the link and comment on their blog: Rmetrics blogs. R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials on topics such as: Data science, Big Data, R jobs, visualization (ggplot2, Boxplots, maps, animation), programming (RStudio, Sweave,...

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New Data Scientist role at Lloyd’s

February 15, 2013
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New Data Scientist role at Lloyd’s

Lloyd's of London is looking for a Data Scientist as part of the Analysis team. See Lloyd's career web site for more details.

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FillIn: a function for filling in missing data in one data frame with info from another

February 15, 2013
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Sometimes I want to use R to fill in values that are missing in one data frame with values from another. For example, I have data from the World Bank on government deficits. However, there are some country-years with missing data. I gathered data from ...

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Sorting rows and colums in a matrix (with some music, and some magic)

February 14, 2013
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Sorting rows and colums in a matrix (with some music, and some magic)

This morning, I was working on some paper on inequality measures, and for computational reasons, I had to sort elements in a matrix. To make it simple, I had a rectangular matrix, like the one below, > set.seed(1) > u=sample(1:(nc*nl)) > (M1=matrix(u,nl,nc)) 7 5 11 23 6 17 9 18 1 21...

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January Seasonality Shiny web application

February 14, 2013
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January Seasonality Shiny web application

Today, I want to share the January Seasonality application (code at GitHub). This example is based on the An Example of Seasonality Analysis post. This is the third application in the series of examples (I plan to share 5 examples) that will demonstrate the amazing Shiny framework and Systematic Investor Toolbox to analyze stocks, make

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Make a Valentine’s Heart with R

February 14, 2013
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Make a Valentine’s Heart with R

If you haven't sent your loved one a Valentine's Day greeting yet, it's not too late! Thanks to Guillermo Santos who pointed out an R script from Berkeley's Concepts in Computing with Data course, I created the following Valentine's Day card for my husband: If you want to make one for your loved one, you can use the R...

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GPS Basemaps in R Using get_map

February 14, 2013
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GPS Basemaps in R Using get_map

There are many different maps you can use for a background map for your gps or other latitude/longitude data (i.e. any time you're using geom_path, geom_segment, or geom_point.)get_mapHelpfully, there's just one function that will allow you to query Google Maps, OpenStreetMap, Stamen maps, or CloudMade maps: get_map in the ggmap package. You could also use either get_googlemap, get_openstreetmap, get_stamenmap, or get_cloudmademap, but...

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Veterinary Epidemiologic Research: Linear Regression

February 14, 2013
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Veterinary Epidemiologic Research: Linear Regression

This post will describe linear regression as from the book Veterinary Epidemiologic Research, describing the examples provided with R. Regression analysis is used for modeling the relationship between a single variable Y (the outcome, or dependent variable) measured on a continuous or near-continuous scale and one or more predictor (independent or explanatory variable), X. If

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