Posts Tagged ‘ Markov chains ’

the Wang-Landau algorithm reaches the flat histogram in finite time

October 19, 2011
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the Wang-Landau algorithm reaches the flat histogram in finite time

Pierre Jacob and Robin Ryder (from Paris-Dauphine, CREST, and Statisfaction) have just arXived (and submitted to the Annals of Applied Probability) a neat result on the Wang-Landau algorithm. (This algorithm, which modifies the target in a sort of reweighted partioned sampling to achieve faster convergence, has always been perplexing to me.)  They show that some

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principles of uncertainty

October 13, 2011
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principles of uncertainty

“Bayes Theorem is a simple consequence of the axioms of probability, and is therefore accepted by all as valid. However, some who challenge the use of personal probability reject certain applications of Bayes Theorem.“  J. Kadane, p.44 Principles of uncertainty by Joseph (“Jay”) Kadane (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh) is a profound and mesmerising book on

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Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo

September 21, 2011
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Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo

At JSM, John Kimmel gave me a copy of the Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo, as I had not (yet?!) received it. This handbook is edited by Steve Brooks, Andrew Gelman, Galin Jones, and Xiao-Li Meng, all first-class jedis of the MCMC galaxy. I had not had a chance to get a look at

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History makes Stat. Science!

December 31, 2010
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History makes Stat. Science!

While the above heading sounds like a title in reverse, its words are in the “correct” order in that our paper with George Casella, A Short History of Markov Chain Monte Carlo, has been accepted for publication by Statistical Science. This publication may sound weird when considering that the paper is also scheduled to appear

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Monte Carlo Statistical Methods third edition

September 23, 2010
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Monte Carlo Statistical Methods third edition

Last week, George Casella and I worked around the clock on starting the third edition of Monte Carlo Statistical Methods by detailing the changes to make and designing the new table of contents. The new edition will not see a revolution in the presentation of the material but rather a more mature perspective on what

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