Posts Tagged ‘ causal inference ’

Descriptive statistics, causal inference, and story time

July 7, 2011
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Dave Backus points me to this review by anthropologist Mike McGovern of two books by economist Paul Collier on the politics of economic development in Africa. My first reaction was that this was interesting but non-statistical so I’d have to either post it on the sister blog or wait until the 30 days of statistics

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Experimental reasoning in social science

July 2, 2011
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As a statistician, I was trained to think of randomized experimentation as representing the gold standard of knowledge in the social sciences, and, despite having seen occasional arguments to the contrary, I still hold that view, expressed pithily by Box, Hunter, and Hunter (1978) that “To find out what happens when you change something, it

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Example 7.36: Propensity score stratification

May 10, 2010
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Example 7.36: Propensity score stratification

In examples 7.34 and 7.35 we described methods using propensity scores to account for possible confounding factors in an observational study.In addition to adjusting for the propensity score in a multiple regression and matching on the propensity score...

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Example 7.35: Propensity score matching

May 3, 2010
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Example 7.35: Propensity score matching

As discussed in example 7.34, it's sometimes preferable to match on propensity scores, rather than adjust for them as a covariate.SASWe use a suite of macros written by Jon Kosanke and Erik Bergstralh at the Mayo Clinic. The dist macro calculates the ...

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Example 7.34: Propensity scores and causal inference from observational studies

April 26, 2010
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Example 7.34: Propensity scores and causal inference from observational studies

Propensity scores can be used to help make causal interpretation of observational data more plausible, by adjusting for other factors that may responsible for differences between groups. Heuristically, we estimate the probability of exposure, rather t...

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