1254 search results for "how to import image file to r"

Adjusting Chinese New Year Effects in R is Easy

February 17, 2014
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Adjusting Chinese New Year Effects in R is Easy

The Spring Festival is the most important holiday in China and many other Asian countries. Traditionally, the holiday starts on Chinese New Year’s Eve, and lasts to the Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the first month of the lunisolar calendar. The Chinese New Year is celebrated either in January or in February of

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A Significantly Improved Significance Test. Not!

February 12, 2014
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A Significantly Improved Significance Test. Not!

It is my great pleasure to share with you a breakthrough in statistical computing. There are many statistical tests: the t-test, the chi-squared test, the ANOVA, etc. I here present a new test, a test that answers the question researchers are most anxious to figure out, a test of significance, the significance test. While a test like the two...

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There is no Such Thing as Biomedical "Big Data"

February 11, 2014
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There is no Such Thing as Biomedical "Big Data"

At the moment, the world is obsessed with “Big Data” yet it sometimes seems that people who use this phrase don’t have a good grasp of its meaning.  Like most good buzz-words, “Big Data” sparks the idea of something grand and complicated, while sounding ordinary enough that listeners feel like they have an intuitive understanding of the concept.  However...

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Three ways to call C/C++ from R

February 10, 2014
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Three ways to call C/C++ from R

By Ben Ogorek Introduction I only recently discovered the fundamental connection between the C and R languages. It was during a Bay Area useR Group meeting, where presenter J.J. Allaire shared two points to motivate his talk on Rcpp. The first explained just how much of modern R really is C and C++. For...

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Cleaning Data and Graphing in R and Python

February 10, 2014
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Cleaning Data and Graphing in R and Python

Python has some pretty awesome data-manipulation and graphing capabilities. If you’re a heavy R-user who dabbles in Python like me, you might wonder what the equivalent commands are in Python for dataframe manipulation. Additionally, I was curious to see how … Continue reading →

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After 1st semester of Statistics PhD program

February 9, 2014
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After 1st semester of Statistics PhD program

Have you ever wondered whether the first semester of a PhD is really all that busy? My complete lack of posts last fall should prove it Some thoughts on the Fall term, now that Spring is well under way: The … Continue reading →

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Bayesian analysis of sensory profiling data, part 2

February 9, 2014
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Bayesian analysis of sensory profiling data, part 2

Last week I made the core of a Bayesian model for sensory profiling data. This week the extras need to be added. That is, there are a bunch of extra interactions and the error is dependent on panelists and descriptors.Note that where last week I pointe...

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An Inconvenient Statistic

February 4, 2014
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An Inconvenient Statistic

As I sit here waiting on more frigid temperatures subsequent to another 10 inches of snow, suffering from metastatic cabin fever, I can't help but ponder what I can do examine global warming/climate change.  Well, as luck would have it, R has the tools to explore this controversy.  Using two packages, vars and forecast, I will see if I...

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Bayesian First Aid: One Sample and Paired Samples t-test

February 4, 2014
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Bayesian First Aid: One Sample and Paired Samples t-test

Student’s t-test is a staple of statistical analysis. A quick search on Google Scholar for “t-test” results in 170,000 hits in 2013 alone. In comparison, “Bayesian” gives 130,000 hits while “box plot” results in only 12,500 hits. To be honest, if I had to choose I would most of the time prefer a notched boxplot to...

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Self-Organising Maps for Customer Segmentation using R

February 3, 2014
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Self-Organising Maps for Customer Segmentation using R

Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) are an unsupervised data visualisation technique that can be used to visualise high-dimensional data sets in lower (typically 2) dimensional representations. In this post, we examine the use of R to create a SOM for customer segmentation. The figures shown here used use the 2011 Irish Census information for the greater Dublin

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