Blog Archives

Allez les Bleus !

May 20, 2014
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Allez les Bleus !

In almost three weeks, the (FIFA) World Cup will start, in Brazil. I have to admit that I am not a big fan of soccer, so I will not talk to much about it. Actually, I wanted to talk about colors, and variations on some colors. For instance, there are a lot of blues. In order to visualize standard...

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Computational Actuarial Science

May 9, 2014
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Computational Actuarial Science

After some delay, the book Computational Actuarial Science with R is now annonced for July 2014. I don’t know if we will be able to get copies for the R in Insurance conference, in London, but I guess everyone is working on it. And kindly, CRC sent me the following flyer, with some reduction code to save 20% (when ordering...

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There is no “Too Big” Data, is there?

April 23, 2014
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There is no “Too Big” Data, is there?

A few years ago, a former classmate came back to me with a simple problem. He was working for some insurance company (and still is, don’t worry, chatting with me is not yet a reason for dismissal), and his problem was that their dataset was too large to run (standard) codes to get a regression, and some predictions. My...

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How Fast the Fastest Human Would Run 100m?

April 16, 2014
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How Fast the Fastest Human Would Run 100m?

Ethan Siegel wrote a post entitled The Math of the Fastest Human Alive five years ago, using regressions. An alternative is too use extreme value models (I wrote a post a long time ago on the maximum length of a tennis match using extreme value theory a few years ago). In 2009, John Einmahl and Sander Smeets wrote a great article...

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Computational Actuarial Science

April 6, 2014
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Computational Actuarial Science

Last week, we’ve been through the book, completely, one last time, before sending it back to the publisher, with some comments and remarks, before publication ! So, this is it, the book will finally appear soon ! It was schedule for this week actually, but… you know. It should appear sometime by the end of May, or beginning of...

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Stationarity of ARCH processes

April 6, 2014
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Stationarity of ARCH processes

In the context of AR(1) processes, we spent some time to explain what happens when  is close to 1. if  the process is stationary, if  the process is a random walk if  the process will explode Again, random walks are extremely interesting processes, with puzzling properties. For instance, as , and the process will cross the x-axis an infinite number...

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Inference for ARCH processes

April 2, 2014
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Inference for ARCH processes

Consider some ARCH() process, say ARCH(), where with a Gaussian (strong) white noise . > n=500 > a1=0.8 > a2=0.0 > w= 0.2 > set.seed(1) > eta=rnorm(n) > epsilon=rnorm(n) > sigma2=rep(w,n) > for(t in 3:n){ + sigma2=w+a1*epsilon^2+a2*epsilon^2 + epsilon=eta*sqrt(sigma2) + } > par(mfrow=c(1,1)) > plot(epsilon,type="l",ylim=c(min(epsilon)-.5,max(epsilon))) > lines(min(epsilon)-1+sqrt(sigma2),col="red") (the red line is the conditional variance process). > par(mfrow=c(1,2)) > acf(epsilon,lag=50,lwd=2)...

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Modeling the Marginals and the Dependence separately

April 1, 2014
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Modeling the Marginals and the Dependence separately

When introducing copulas, it is commonly admitted that copulas are interesting because they allow to model the marginals and the dependence structure separately. The motivation is probably Sklar’s theorem, which says that given some marginal cumulative distribution functions (say  and , in dimension 2), and a copula (denoted ), then we can generate a multivariate cumulative distribution function with...

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Correlation with constraints on pairs

March 31, 2014
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Correlation with constraints on pairs

An interesting question was posted on http://math.stackexchange.com/726205/…: if one knows the covariances  and , is it possible to infer ? I asked myself a question close to this one a few weeks ago (that I might also relate to a question I asked a long time ago, about possible correlations between three exchange rates, on financial markets). More precisely, if one knows the...

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Seasonal Unit Roots

March 26, 2014
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Seasonal Unit Roots

As discussed in the MAT8181 course, there are – at least – two kinds of non-stationary time series: those with a trend, and those with a unit-root (they will be called integrated). Unit root tests cannot be used to assess whether a time series is stationary, or not. They can only detect integrated time series. And the same holds...

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