Posts Tagged ‘ fun with simple math ’

Because it’s Friday: French Press Heat Retention

May 13, 2011
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Because it’s Friday: French Press Heat Retention

While responding to this thread on Reddit I made a rough guess as to the heat retention of my french press when completely full of coffee. When I went to bed I realized there was no good reason why I … Continue reading →

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No simulation is complete without a gif

March 24, 2011
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No simulation is complete without a gif

I promise this is my last post on the now week and a half old π pay! Building on the last post, I figured I could show how convergence actually works in the estimation algorithm. If you’ll recall, we plotted … Continue reading →

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More pi plus 1 (or plus 0.01) day fun

March 15, 2011
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More pi plus 1 (or plus 0.01) day fun

Since I just didn’t get enough this morning, I spent some more time fooling around with estimating pi. Since I was basically counting the number of random x,y pairs inside a quarter circle and computing a sample average for more … Continue reading →

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I’m late for π day

March 15, 2011
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I’m late for π day

It is officially no longer pi day, but I didn’t see this Drew Conway post about estimating pi until just a few minutes ago. Because Google Reader doesn’t show github embeds, I also got to try it without seeing Drew’s … Continue reading →

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Bootstrapping the Truncated Normal Distribution

March 2, 2011
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Bootstrapping the Truncated Normal Distribution

Here’s a post generated from my own ignorance of statistics (as opposed to just being marred by it)! In Labor Economics we walked through something called the truncated normal distribution. Truncated distributions come up a lot in the sciences because … Continue reading →

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Stationarity

February 9, 2011
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Stationarity

In time series work you often run into difficulties in modeling processes where the overall level of one variable (an input, for example) changes over time but the levels of another variable (an output) do not change. For instance if … Continue reading →

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Null Confusion

January 25, 2011
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Null Confusion

Talking a bit with my friend Jarrod about math stats and econometrics, we both came to the conclusion that the standard presentation for basic inference is lacking. In an intro or intermediate applied statistics course you learn about first and … Continue reading →

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