Why the 2012 US elections are more exciting than 2008

November 4, 2012
By

(This article was first published on Beautiful Data » R, and kindly contributed to R-bloggers)

Here’s an addition to my last post on using Wikipedia data to analyse attention for the US presidential elections 2012. Here’s another look at the interest not for the candidates’ Wikipedia pages but the general pages for the elections 2008 and 2012. Compared to the candidates’ pages, the attention for the general election page is much lower than for the candidates. Here’s the average values for October 2012:

  1. Mitt Romney (2012): 98,138 Views / day
  2. Barack Obama (2012): 63,104 Views / day
  3. United States presidential election, 2012 (2012): 38,770
  4. United States presidential election, 2008 (2008): 27,907

This monthly average hints at the 2012 elections being very exciting as the general election pages on Wikipedia have seen a 39% traffic increase compared to last elections. This also hold for the following time-series:

US Presidential Elections 2012 vs. 2008 (Wikipedia, daily visits)

US Presidential Elections 2012 vs. 2008 (Wikipedia, daily visits)

While the attention for the election pages in 2012 did not reach the level it had during the 2008 primaries, from mid October the 2012 campaigns were much more interesting according to the Wikipedia numbers. In 2008 we have seen a drop in attention before election day, in 2012 the suspense seems to build up.

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