Introducing Statwing

April 27, 2014
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Recently, Greg Laughlin, the founder of a new statistical software called Statwing, let me try his product for free. I happen to like free things very much (the college student is strong within me) so I gave it a try.

www.statwing.com

I mostly like how easy it is to use: For instance, to relate two attributes like Age and Income, you click Age, click Income, and click Relate.

So what can Statwing do?

  1. Summarize an attribute (like “age”): totals, averages, standard deviation, confidence intervals, percentiles, visual graphs like the one below
  2. Relate two columns together (“Openness” vs “Extraversion”)
  • Plots the two attributes against eachother to see how they relate. It will include the formula of the regression line and the R-squared value.
  • Sometimes a chi-square-style table is more appropriate. The software determines how best to represent the data.
     
  • Tests the null hypothesis that the attributes are independent, by a T-test, F-test (ANOVA) or chi-square test. Statwing determines which one is appropriate.
  • Repeat the above for a ranked correlation.

For now, you can’t forecast a time series or represent data on maps. But Greg told me that the team is adding new features as I type this.

If you’d like to try the software yourself, click here. They’ve got three sample datasets to play with:

  1. Titanic passengers information
  2. The results of a psychological survey
  3. A list of congressman, their voting record and donations.

Abbas Keshvani

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