Posts Tagged ‘ nature ’

Testing and significance

September 12, 2011
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Testing and significance

Julien Cornebise pointed me to this Guardian article that itself summarises the findings of a Nature Neuroscience article I cannot access. The core of the paper is that a large portion of comparative studies conclude to a significant difference between protocols when one protocol result is significantly different from zero and the other one(s) is(are)

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Truly random [again]

December 9, 2010
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Truly random [again]

“The measurement outputs contain at the 99% confidence level 42 new random bits. This is a much stronger statement than passing or not passing statistical tests, which merely indicate that no obvious non-random patterns are present.” arXiv:0911.3427 As often, I bought La Recherche in the station newsagent for the wrong reason! The cover of the

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From the “blogosphere”? Hardly.

January 27, 2010
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From the “blogosphere”? Hardly.

I generally skip over “From the Blogosphere”, a (mostly) weekly-summary of one or two blog posts in Nature’s “Authors” section (here is the latest). Why? Well, I’ve always suspected that the title is rather misleading. Now, I have the hard numbers to prove it. My feed reader contains an archive of 128 articles, dating back

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