Posts Tagged ‘ INLA ’

INLA: Bayes goes to Norway

August 15, 2012
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INLA: Bayes goes to Norway

INLA is not the Norwegian answer to ABBA; that would probably be a-ha. INLA is the answer to ‘Why do I have enough time to cook a three-course meal while running MCMC analyses?”. Integrated Nested Laplace Approximations (INLA) is based … Continue reading →

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Bayes on drugs (guest post)

May 20, 2012
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Bayes on drugs (guest post)

This post is written by Julien Cornebise. Last week in Aachen was the 3rd Edition of the Bayes(Pharma) workshop. Its specificity: half-and-half industry/academic participants and speakers, all in Pharmaceutical statistics, with a great care to welcome newcomers to Bayes, so as to spread as much as possible the love where it will actually be used.

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Functional ANOVA using INLA

January 13, 2012
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Functional ANOVA using INLA

Ramsay and Silverman’s Functional Data Analysis is a tremendously useful book that deserves to be more widely known. It’s full of ideas of neat things one can do when part of a dataset can be viewed as a set of

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Latent Gaussian Models im Zürich [day 2]

February 6, 2011
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Latent Gaussian Models im Zürich [day 2]

The second day at the Latent Gaussian Models workshop in Zürich was equally interesting. Among the morning talks, let me mention Daniel Bové who gave a talk connected with the hyper-g prior paper he wrote with Leo Held (commented in an earlier post) and the duo of Janine Illian and Daniel Simpson who gave enthusiastic

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Bayesian Inference for Latent Gaussian Models

November 12, 2010
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Bayesian Inference for Latent Gaussian Models

An exciting conference in Zurich next February, 02-05. (I think I will attend! And not for skiing reasons!) Latent Gaussian models have numerous applications, for example in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology and climate modelling. This workshop brings together researchers who develop and apply Bayesian inference in this broad model class. One methodological focus is on

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