Posts Tagged ‘ current events ’

Bad Science at Strata 2012

March 1, 2012
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Ben Goldacre, the physician and biostatistician behind the always-excellent Bad Science column in the Guardian, gave a barnburner of a talk at Strata 2012 yesterday, "The Information Architecture of Medicine is Broken". For anyone not aware of the problems caused by publication bias in clinical trials (for example, ineffective drugs with a wide variety of side-effects coming to market),...

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R charts used for analysis at Politico

February 10, 2012
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R charts used for analysis at Politico

Zack Abrahamson, the "data whiz" at political analysis site Politico, is apparently an R user. Politico's Feb 10 2012 chart of the day clearly uses the ggplot2 graphics package and (quoting Politico) looks into the disenchanted slice of the GOP that’s not engaged with its party’s primary. And that slice doesn’t like Mitt Romney. People say turnout's down. When...

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R Chart featured in Facebook IPO

February 2, 2012
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R Chart featured in Facebook IPO

Page 7 of Facebook's 213-page S-1 filing for their record-breaking IPO includes the following chart, under the headline: "Our Mission: To make the world more open and connected". This chart was created using the R language and Hadoop by Facebook intern Paul Butler. (Thanks to the blog IOER Tools for first noticing the inclusion of the chart.) And speaking...

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NYT uses R to map the 1%

January 17, 2012
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NYT uses R to map the 1%

Last Saturday, the New York Times published a feature article on the wealthiest 1% of Americans. The on-line version of the article included interactive features like this interactive map showing where your household ranks in the country and in local regions. The print edition, however, included some different (and necessarily static) representations of US wealth data, such as this...

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Mapping the Iowa caucus results: how it’s done with R

January 6, 2012
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Mapping the Iowa caucus results: how it’s done with R

If you've been following the presidential primary process here in the US, you've probably seen many maps of the results of the Iowa caucuses by now (such as this infamous one from Fox News). But you might be interested to learn how such maps can be made using the R language. The Offensive Politics blog explains the process in...

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Propagation of the news of OBL’s death via Twitter

May 6, 2011
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Propagation of the news of OBL’s death via Twitter

SocialFlow's blog has a great case study today on how news from a single tweet -- in this case, speculation made an hour before the President's announcement that Osama bin Laden had been killed -- can propagate through social networks. At 10:24 p.m. EST on Sunday May 1, Keith Urbahn tweeted: "So I'm told by a reputable person they...

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How to load your iPhone location data into R

April 22, 2011
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How to load your iPhone location data into R

Earlier this week, data scientists Pete Warden and Alasdair Allen reported that iPhones and cell-enabled iPads keep an internal log of the devices location, which is accessible from the backup that iTunes creates when you sync the device. (Update Apr 27: Apple responds that the locations are those of nearby cell towers and wi-fi hotspots, not the device itself.)...

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Visualizing tax brackets

April 15, 2011
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Visualizing tax brackets

With Tax Day fast approaching here in the US, there's been a lot of discussion about tax policy and in particular the tax rates paid by the highest income earners. Like in many countries, here the income tax system is bracketed: Tax Bracket Single Married Filing Jointly 10% Bracket $0 – $8,375 $0 – $16,750 15% Bracket $8,375 –...

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The Egyptian Revolution, in tweets

February 16, 2011
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The Egyptian Revolution, in tweets

Twitter played a significant role in the recent uprising in Egypt, with protesters communicating via tweets marked with the #25bahman hastag (February 14 in the arabic calendar) to plan and rally for the demonstration. Michael Bommarito downloaded all such tweets and plotted their frequency over time using R's ggplot2 library: Not surprisingly, the activity peaked on February 14. The...

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Airport security: science vs backlash

November 19, 2010
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The United States has recently introduced millimeter wave and backscatter x-ray scanners to the security screening process in many airports, prompting a backlash in some quarters. Much of the opposition is centered around the invasion of privacy: the scanners generate an image of the traveller's naked body. There are also health concerns, at least for the backscatter x-ray variants...

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