Posts Tagged ‘ Books ’

principles of uncertainty

October 13, 2011
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principles of uncertainty

“Bayes Theorem is a simple consequence of the axioms of probability, and is therefore accepted by all as valid. However, some who challenge the use of personal probability reject certain applications of Bayes Theorem.“  J. Kadane, p.44 Principles of uncertainty by Joseph (“Jay”) Kadane (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh) is a profound and mesmerising book on

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Typos in Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods with R

October 12, 2011
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Typos in Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods with R

The two translators of our book in Japanese, Kazue & Motohiro Ishida, contacted me about some R code mistakes in the book. The translation is nearly done and they checked every piece of code in the book, an endeavour for which I am very grateful! Here are the two issues they have noticed (after incorporating

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R related books: Traditional vs online publishing

October 12, 2011
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R related books: Traditional vs online publishing

How many R related books have been published so far? Who is the most popular publisher? How many other manuals, tutorials and books have been published online? Let's find out. A few years ago I used the publication list on r-project.org as an argument ...

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understanding computational Bayesian statistics

October 9, 2011
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understanding computational Bayesian statistics

I have just finished reading this book by Bill Bolstad (University of Waikato, New Zealand) which a previous ‘Og post pointed out when it appeared, shortly after our Introducing Monte Carlo Methods with R. My family commented that the cover was nicer than those of my own books, which is true. Before I launch into

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Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo

September 21, 2011
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Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo

At JSM, John Kimmel gave me a copy of the Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo, as I had not (yet?!) received it. This handbook is edited by Steve Brooks, Andrew Gelman, Galin Jones, and Xiao-Li Meng, all first-class jedis of the MCMC galaxy. I had not had a chance to get a look at

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About commercial publishers

September 19, 2011
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About commercial publishers

Julien Cornebise has pointed out a recent Guardian article. It is about commercial publishers of academic journals, mainly Elsevier, Springer, and Wiley, with a clear stand from its title: “Academic publishers make Murdoch look like a socialist“! The valuable argument therein is that academic publishers make hefty profits (a 40% margin for Elsevier!)

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Bayes-250, Edinburgh [day 2]

September 6, 2011
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Bayes-250, Edinburgh [day 2]

After a terrific run this morning to the top of Arthur’s Seat, and then around (the ribs are feeling fine, now!), the Bayes-250 talks were exhilarating and challenging. Jim Smith gave an introduction to the challenges of getting different experts to collaborate on a complex risk assessment, much in the spirit of his book, that

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A misleading title…

September 4, 2011
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A misleading title…

When I received this book, Handbook of fitting statistical distributions with R, by Z. Karian and E.J. Dudewicz,  from/for the Short Book Reviews section of the International Statistical Review, I was obviously impressed by its size (around 1700 pages and 3 kilos…). From briefly glancing at the table of contents, and the list of standard

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Posts of the year

August 30, 2011
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Posts of the year

Like last year, here are the most popular posts since last August: Home page 92,982 In{s}a(ne)!! 6,803 “simply start over and build something better” 5,834 Julien on R shortcomings 2,373 Parallel processing of independent Metropolis-Hastings algorithms 1,455 Do we need an integrated Bayesian/likelihood inference? 1,361 Coincidence in lotteries 1,256 #2 blog for the statistics geek?! 863

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Numerical analysis for statisticians

August 25, 2011
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Numerical analysis for statisticians

“In the end, it really is just a matter of choosing the relevant parts of mathematics and ignoring the rest. Of course, the hard part is deciding what is irrelevant.” Somehow, I had missed the first edition of this book and thus I started reading it this afternoon with a newcomer’s eyes (obviously, I will

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