Posts Tagged ‘ book review ’

Review of “R For Dummies”

October 15, 2012
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Review of “R For Dummies”

The authors are Andrie de Vries and Joris Meys. Executive summary Pretty much all I’d hoped for — and I had high hopes. Significance The “Dummies” series is popular for introducing specific topics in an inviting way. R For Dummies is a worthy addition to the pack. There is a competitor by the name of … Continue reading...

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Annotations for “R For Dummies”

October 15, 2012
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Annotations for “R For Dummies”

Here are detailed comments on the book.  Elsewhere there is a review of the book. How to read R For Dummies In order to learn R you need to do something with it.  After you have read a little of the book, find something to do.  Mix reading and doing your project. You cannot win … Continue reading...

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Review of “Numerical Methods and Optimization in Finance” by Gilli, Maringer and Schumann

September 12, 2012
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Review of “Numerical Methods and Optimization in Finance” by Gilli, Maringer and Schumann

Previously This book and the associated R package were introduced before. Executive Summary A very nice — and enlightening — discussion of a wide range of topics. Principles The Introduction to the book sets out 5 principles.  This is probably the most important part of the book.  The principles are: We don’t know much in … Continue reading...

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Two new, important books on R

June 22, 2012
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Two new, important books on R

Two books were recently published that are sure to help R grow even faster. R has a reputation, partially deserved, for being hard to learn.  These books will help.  The first makes learning easier, the second can make learning less necessary for initiates. I have not yet touched either book. R for Dummies The authors … Continue reading...

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Review of “The Origin of Financial Crises” by George Cooper

March 19, 2012
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Review of “The Origin of Financial Crises” by George Cooper

The subtitle is “Central banks, credit bubbles and the efficient market fallacy”. Executive summary This is much too important of a book to remain as obscure as it is.  Besides, it is quite a fun read. It talks about two subjects: Why markets for goods and services tend toward equilibrium but financial markets do not. … Continue reading...

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Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS

November 6, 2011
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Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS

Yes, yet another Bayesian textbook: Ioannis Ntzoufras’ Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS was published in 2009 and it got an honourable mention at the 2009 PROSE Award. (Nice acronym for a book award! All the mathematics books awarded that year were actually statistics books.) Bayesian modeling using WinBUGS is rather similar to the more recent Bayesian

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Bayesian ideas and data analysis

October 30, 2011
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Bayesian ideas and data analysis

Here is another Bayesian textbook that appeared recently. I read it in the past few days and, despite my obvious biases and prejudices, I liked it very much! It has a lot in common (at least in spirit) with our Bayesian Core, which may explain why I feel so benevolent towards Bayesian ideas and

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Introduction to “Numerical Methods and Optimization in Finance”

October 27, 2011
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Introduction to “Numerical Methods and Optimization in Finance”

The book is by Manfred Gilli, Dietmar Maringer and Enrico Schumann.  I haven’t actually seen the book, so my judgement of it is mainly by the cover (and knowing the first two authors). The parts of the book closest to my heart are optimization, particularly portfolio optimization, and particularly particularly portfolio optimization via heuristic algorithms.  … Continue reading...

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understanding computational Bayesian statistics: a reply from Bill Bolstad

October 23, 2011
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understanding computational Bayesian statistics: a reply from Bill Bolstad

Bill Bolstad wrote a reply to my review of his book Understanding computational Bayesian statistics last week and here it is, unedited except for the first paragraph where he thanks me for the opportunity to respond, “so readers will see that the book has some good features beyond having a “nice cover”.” (!) I simply processed

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principles of uncertainty

October 13, 2011
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principles of uncertainty

“Bayes Theorem is a simple consequence of the axioms of probability, and is therefore accepted by all as valid. However, some who challenge the use of personal probability reject certain applications of Bayes Theorem.“  J. Kadane, p.44 Principles of uncertainty by Joseph (“Jay”) Kadane (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh) is a profound and mesmerising book on

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