4036 search results for "git"

source_https(): Sourcing an R Script from github over HTTPS

November 24, 2011
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source_https(): Sourcing an R Script from github over HTTPS

The Objective I wanted to source R scripts hosted on my github repository for use in my blog (i.e. a github version of ?source). This would make it easier for anyone wishing to test out my code snippets on their own computers without having to manually go to my github repo and retrieve a series of R

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Longitudinal analysis: autocorrelation makes a difference

October 25, 2011
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Longitudinal analysis: autocorrelation makes a difference

Back to posting after a long weekend and more than enough rugby coverage to last a few years. Anyway, back to linear models, where we usually assume normality, independence and homogeneous variances. In most statistics courses we live in a … Continue reading →

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Because it’s Friday: Reviews of Random Digits

October 7, 2011
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If you dig around enough on Amazon.com, you can find some pretty odd products (like the Badonkadonk tank now sadly unavailable). Attached to these products you can often find a new form of comedy: the funny Amazon review. The products that attract such attention can be hard to fathom: this gallon of milk has more than 1,000 reviews. (Sample:...

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Benford’s law, or the First-digit law

August 25, 2011
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Benford’s law, or the First-digit law

Benford's law, also called the first-digit law, states that in lists of numbers from many (but not all) real-life sources of data, the leading digit is distributed in a specific, non-uniform way. According to this law, the first digit is 1 about 30% of the time, and larger digits occur as the leading digit with lower and lower frequency,...

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Plotting git statistics

July 13, 2011
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Plotting git statistics

Here’s a funny story – friend of my, avid gamer at that time, was going downhill on a bicycle when wonderful idea flashed his mind: I need to save the current status… Just in case if I crash, I will start again from the top of the hill. If you are a developer (quantitative or

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Putting together multinomial discrete regressions by combining simple logits

June 29, 2011
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When predicting 0/1 data we can use logit (or probit or robit or some other robust model such as invlogit (0.01 + 0.98*X*beta)). Logit is simple enough and we can use bayesglm to regularize and avoid the problem of separation. What if there are more than 2 categories? If they’re ordered (1, 2, 3, etc),

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Digitizing data from old plots using ‘digitize’

June 23, 2011
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The June 2011 issue of The R Journal contains an article on the R package digitize (link to pdf) by Timothée Poisot. This might prove to be a handy tool if you occasionally find yourself needing to retrieve data points from figures in old articles for...

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Stata-like Marginal Effects for Logit and Probit Models in R [2]

May 18, 2011
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Stata-like Marginal Effects for Logit and Probit Models in R [2]

My thanks to those who emailed comments and suggestions for my ‘mfx’ function, I’m happy that I could fill a void for some people. I also received a request/suggestion from Tony Cookson, along with a helpful fix for a bug in the code, to include an option that would allow the user to specify values

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Stata-like Marginal Effects for Logit and Probit Models in R

May 17, 2011
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Stata-like Marginal Effects for Logit and Probit Models in R

Although this blog’s primary focus is time series, one feature I missed from Stata was the simple marginal effects command, ‘mfx compute’, for cross-sectional work, and I could not find an adequate replacement in R. To bridge this gap, I’ve written a (rather messy) R function to produce marginal effects readout for logit and probit

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Globally Set Digits in Sweave

March 30, 2011
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Globally Set Digits in Sweave

I use Sweave regularly for most of my writing and love the way it works. However, one issue that often irks me is the inability to globally set the number of digits to display. Here is a minimal example that illustrates my point. If we now display the numbers using Sexpr, this is what we

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