Blog Archives

Showing a distribution over time: how many summary stats?

August 13, 2015
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Showing a distribution over time: how many summary stats?

I saw this nice graph today on Twitter, by Thomas Forth: but the more I looked at it, the more I felt it was hard to understand the changes over time across the income distribution from the Gini coefficient and … Continue reading →

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St Swithun’s Day simulator

July 15, 2015
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St Swithun’s Day simulator

I got a bit bored (sorry Mike), and wrote this. I didn’t take long (I tell you that not so much to cover my backside as to celebrate the majesty of R). First, I estimated probabilities of a day being … Continue reading →

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Roman dataviz and inference in complex systems

May 29, 2015
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Roman dataviz and inference in complex systems

I’m in Rome at the International Workshop on Computational Economics and Econometrics. I gave a seminar on Monday on the ever-popular subject of data visualization. Slides are here. In a few minutes, I’ll be speaking on Inference in Complex Systems, … Continue reading →

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Slice bivariate densities, or the Joy Division “waterfall plot”

October 8, 2014
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Slice bivariate densities, or the Joy Division “waterfall plot”

This has been on my to-do list for a long old time. Lining up slices through a bivariate density seems a much more intuitive way of depicting it than contour plots or some ghastly rotating 3-D thing (urgh). Of course, … Continue reading →

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Transparent hurricane paths in R

October 1, 2014
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Transparent hurricane paths in R

Arthur Charpentier has written a really nice blog post about obtaining hurricane tracks and plotting them. He then goes on to do other clever Markov process models, but as a dataviz guy who knows almost nothing about meteorology, I want to … Continue reading →

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Save your simulation study seeds

September 11, 2014
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Save your simulation study seeds

Here in the Northern hemisphere, gardeners are gathering seeds from their prize-winning vegetables are storing them away for next year’s crop. Today at the 20th London Stata Users’ Group meeting, I learnt a similar trick. It’s strange I never thought … Continue reading →

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Two handy documents for making good UK maps

July 4, 2014
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Two handy documents for making good UK maps

Everybody loves a good map. Even if you don’t have any reason to make one, your boss will love it when you do, so check this out and get yourself a pay rise (possibly). First, this set of diagrams via … Continue reading →

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Meta-analysis methods when studies are not normally distributed

June 10, 2014
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Meta-analysis methods when studies are not normally distributed

Yesterday I was reading Kontopantelis & Reeves’s 2010 paper “Performance of statistical methods for meta-analysis when true study effects are non-normally distributed: A simulation study“, which compares fixed-effects and a variety of random effects models under the (entirely realistic) situation … Continue reading →

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Stats in bed, part 1: Ubuntu Touch

April 25, 2014
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Stats in bed, part 1: Ubuntu Touch

Round at the RSS Statistical Computing committee, we were having a chuckle at the prospect of a meeting about Stats In Bed. By which I mean analysis on mobile devices, phones and tablets (henceforth phablets), not some sort of raunchy … Continue reading →

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Beeps and progress alerts to your phone

April 9, 2014
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Beeps and progress alerts to your phone

Recently I encountered an R package called pingr, made by Rasmus Bååth (the same guy who did MCMC in a web page, my visualization of 2013). You install it, you type ping(), and it goes ping. Nice. In fact there … Continue reading →

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