Blog Archives

A new default plot for multivariate dispersions

April 17, 2016
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A new default plot for multivariate dispersions

This weekend, prompted by a pull request from Michael Friendly, I finally got round to improving the plot method for betadisper() in the vegan package. betadisper() is an implementation of Marti Anderson’s Permdisp method, a multivariate analogue of Levene’s test for homogeneity of variances. In improving the default plot and allowing customisation of plot features, I was reminded of...

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Soap-film smoothers & lake bathymetries

March 27, 2016
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Soap-film smoothers & lake bathymetries

A number of years ago, whilst I was still working at ENSIS, the consultancy arm of the ECRC at UCL, I worked on a project for the (then) Countryside Council for Wales (CCW; now part of Natural Resources Wales). I don’t recall why they were doing this project, but we were tasked with producing a...

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Additive modelling global temperature time series: revisited

March 25, 2016
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Additive modelling global temperature time series: revisited

Quite some time ago, back in 2011, I wrote a post that used an additive model to fit a smooth trend to the then-current Hadley Centre/CRU global temperature time series data set. Since then the media and scientific papers have been full of reports of record warm temperatures in the past couple of years, of controversies (imagined) regarding...

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Are some seasons warming more than others?

November 23, 2015
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Are some seasons warming more than others?

I ended the last post with some pretty plots of air temperature change within and between years in the Central England Temperature series. The elephant in the room1 at the end of that post was is the change in the within year (seasonal) effect over time statistically significant? This is the question I’ll try to answer,...

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Climate change and spline interactions

November 21, 2015
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Climate change and spline interactions

In a series of irregular posts1 I’ve looked at how additive models can be used to fit non-linear models to time series. Up to now I’ve looked at models that included a single non-linear trend, as well as a model that included a within-year (or seasonal) part and a trend part. In this trend plus season model it...

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User-friendly scaling

October 8, 2015
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User-friendly scaling

Back in the mists of time, whilst programming early versions of Canoco, Cajo ter Braak decided to allow users to specify how species and site ordination scores were scaled relative to one another via a simple numeric coding system. This was fine for the DOS-based software that Canoco was at the time; you entered 2 when prompted and you...

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My aversion to pipes

June 3, 2015
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At the risk of coming across as even more of a curmudgeonly old fart than people already think I am, I really do dislike the current vogue in R that is the pipe family of binary operators; e.g. %>%. Introduced by Hadley Wickham and popularised and advanced via the magrittr package by Stefan Milton Bache, the basic idea...

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Something is rotten in the state of Denmark

June 2, 2015
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On Twitter and elsewhere there has been much wailing and gnashing of teeth for some time over one particular aspect of the R ecosphere: CRAN. I’m not here to argue that everything is peachy — far from it in fact — but I am going to argue that the problems we face do not begin and end with...

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Drawing rarefaction curves with custom colours

April 16, 2015
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Drawing rarefaction curves with custom colours

I was sent an email this week by a vegan user who wanted to draw rarefaction curves using rarecurve() but with different colours for each curve. The solution to this one is quite easy as rarecurve() has argument col so the user could supply the appropriate vector of colours to use when plotting. However, they wanted to distinguish all...

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Harvesting Canadian climate data

January 14, 2015
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Harvesting Canadian climate data

In December I found myself helping one of our graduate students with a data problem; for one of their thesis chapters they needed a lot of hourly climate data for a handful of stations around Saksatchewan. All of this data was and is available for download from the Government of Canada’s website, but with one catch; you had to...

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