Blog Archives

The undiscovered country – a tutorial on plotting maps in R

February 25, 2012
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The undiscovered country – a tutorial on plotting maps in R

The ability to handle maps and geospatial images is always a nice trick to have up your sleeve. Almost any sizeable report will contain a map – of a locality, of a country, or of the world. However, very few analysts have the ability to produce these plots for themselves and often resort to using...

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Web scraping with Python – the dark side of data

December 27, 2011
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In searching for some information on web-scrapers, I found a great presentation given at Pycon in 2010 by Asheesh Laroia. I thought this might be a valuable resource for R users who are looking for ways to gather data from user-unfriendly websites. The...

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The R apply function – a tutorial with examples

July 2, 2011
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Today I had one of those special moments that is uniquely associated with R. One of my colleagues was trying to solve what I term an 'Excel problem'. That is, one where the problem magically disappears once a programming language is employed. Put simpl...

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Multiple plots in R: lesson zero

June 24, 2011
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Multiple plots in R: lesson zero

Today, in one of my more productive days, I managed to create a sleek R script that plotted several histograms in a lattice, allowing for easy identification of the underlying trend. Although the majority of the time taken consisted of collecting the data and making various adjustments, it took a not inconsiderable amount of work to write the...

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Survival skills for today’s analyst

April 21, 2011
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I suffer a little from the age-old affliction of contrarianism. If a software package is used by the majority of the population, I assume it is flawed, highly limited, and its continued use will ultimately result in the downfall of the human race. Conversely, I am always extremely interested in a piece of software that has spread no further...

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Survival skills for today’s analyst

April 21, 2011
By

I suffer a little from the age-old affliction of contrarianism. If a software package is used by the majority of the population, I assume it is flawed, highly limited, and its continued use will ultimately result in the downfall of the human race. Conversely, I am always extremely interested in a piece of software that has spread no further...

Read more »